Aspen Bibliography

Title

Nest predation rates in managed and reserved extensive northern hardwood forests

Authors

R.M. DeGraaf

Document Type

Article

Journal/Book Title/Conference

Forest Ecology and Management

Volume

79

Issue

3

First Page

227

Last Page

234

Publication Date

1995

Abstract

Depredation rates on artificial ground and shrub nests in large blocks of managed and remote reserved northern hardwood forests were studied in the White Mountain National Forest (WMNF) (303 930 ha) in New Hampshire, USA, from June to August 1991. Both types of nests were monitored by trip cameras that recorded depredations as eggs were removed. No differences in nest predation rates were found for either ground or shrub nests between managed and reserved forest blocks. Elevated nest predation rates are generally considered to be indicative of fragmented forest conditions; the results of this study suggest that extensive northern hardwood forests in northern New England are not fragmented by even-aged silviculture with clearcut regeneration, which is commonly used to manage northern hardwoods. All identified nest predators were mammals.