Bark beetle outbreaks have resulted in the loss of hundreds of thousands of conifers on approximately 30 million hectares of forested lands in western North America during the last decade. Many forests remain susceptible to bark beetle infestation and will continue to experience high levels of conifer mortality until suitable host trees are depleted, or natural factors cause populations to collapse. Stand conditions and drought, combined with warming temperatures, have contributed to the severity of these outbreaks, particularly in high-elevation forests.

Conventional wisdom suggests that large scale bark beetle outbreaks alter fuel complexes resulting in an increased potential for severe fires. Conversely, fires damage trees that may predispose them to bark beetle attack. In reality there is little specific quantified data supporting these assertions, and until recently, relationships between fire and western bark beetles in forests of North America have not been extensively studied. The magnitude of recent outbreaks and large wildfires has resulted in a flurry of research attempting to quantify bark beetle/fire/fuel interactions.
 
We hope and expect that our freely accessible, online bibliography may be of great benefit to any scholarly research. The bibliography searching can be conducted through titles, by author name, or by descriptive words. Where possible, full text of the documents are provided as PDF documents.

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2016

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Evaluating crown fire rate of spread predictions from physics-based models, C. M. Hoffman, J. Canfield, R. R. Linn, W. Mell, C. H. Sieg, F. Pimon, and J. Ziegler; Fire Technology

2015

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Fuel loads and simulated fire behavior in “old stage” beetle-infested ponderosa pine of the Colorado Plateau, E. Mathew Hansen, M. C. Johnson, Barbara J. Bentz, J. C. Vandygriff, and A. Steven Munson; Forest Science

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Modeling spatial and temporal dynamics of wind flow and potential fire behavior following a mountain pine beetle outbreak in a lodgepole pine forest, C. M. Hoffman, R. R. Linn, R. Parsons, C. H. Sieg, and J. L. Winterkamp; Agricultural and Forest Meteorology

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Bark beetles and wildfires: How does forest recovery change with repeated disturbances in mixed conifer forests?, C. P. Stevens-Rumann, C. P. Morgan, and C. Hoffman; Ecosphere

2014

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Spruce Beetle Biology, Ecology and Management in the Rocky Mountains: An Addendum to Spruce Beetle in the Rockies, Michael J. Jenkins, Elizabeth G. Hebertson, and A. Steven Munson; Forests

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Decoupling seasonal changes in water content and dry matter to predict live conifer foliar moisture content., W. M. Jolly, A. M. Hadlow, and K. Huguet; International Journal of Wildland Fire

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Douglas-fir tussock moth and Douglas-fir beetle-caused mortality in a ponderosa pine/Douglas-fir forest in the Colorado Front Range, USA, J. F. Negrón, A. M. Lynch, W. C. Schaupp Jr., and J. E. Mercado; Forests

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Spruce Beetle-Induced Changes to Engelmann Spruce Foliage Flammability, Wesley G. Page, Michael J. Jenkins, and Justin B. Runyon; Forest Science

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Crown fire potential in lodgepole pine forests during the red stage of mountain pine beetle attack, Wesley G. Page, M. J. Jenkins, and M. E. Alexander; Forestry

2013

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Assessing the effect of foliar moisture on the spread rate of crown fires, Martin E. Alexander and M. G. Cruz; International Journal of Wildland Fire

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Monoterpene emissions from bark beetle infested Engelmann spruce trees, Hardik S. Amin, Rachel S. Russo, Barkley Sive, E. Richard Hoebeke, Craig Dodson, Ian B. McCubbin, A. Gannet Hallar, and Kara E. Huff Hartz; Atmospheric Environment

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Bark beetle outbreaks, wildfires and defensible space: how much area do we need to treat to protect homes and communities?, Glen Aronson and Dominik Kulakowski; International Journal of Wildland Fire

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The impact of bark beetle infestations on monoterpene emissions and secondary organic aerosol formation in western North America, A. R. Berg, C. L. Heald, K. E. Huff Hartz, A. G. Hallar, A. J. H. Meddens, J. A. Hicke, J.-F. Lamarque, and S. Tilmes; Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

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Do Bark Beetle Outbreaks Increase Wildfire Risks in the Central U.S. Rocky Mountains? Implications from Recent Research, Scott H. Black, Dominik Kulakowski, Barry R. Noon, and Dominick A. DellaSala; Natural Areas Journal

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Bark beetle effects on fuel profiles across a range of stand structures in Douglas-fir forests of Greater Yellowstone, Daniel C. Donato, Brian J. Harvey, William H. Romme, Martin Simard, and Monica G. Turner; Ecological Applications

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Evaluating post-outbreak management effects on future fuel profiles and stand structure in bark beetle-impacted forests of Greater Yellowstone, Daniel C. Donato, Martin Simard, William H. Romme, Brian J. Harvey, and Monica G. Turner; Forest Ecology and Management

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Characterizing wildfire hazard and risk in mountain pine beetle-affected stands and how to identify those characteristics at the landscape-scale, Robert W. Gray; Fire Management Today

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Forest Development and Carbon Dynamics After Mountain Pine Beetle Outbreaks, E. Matthew Hansen; Forest Science

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Influence of recent bark beetle outbreak on fire severity and post-fire tree regeneration in montane Douglas-fir forests, Brian J. Harvey, Daniel C. Donato, William H. Romme, and Monica G. Turner; Ecological Society of America

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Changes in transpiration and foliage growth in lodgepole pine trees following mountain pine beetle attack and mechanical girdling, Robert M. Hubbard, Charles C. Rhoades, Kelly Elder, and Jose Negron; Forest Ecology and Management

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Interactions Among the Mountain Pine Beetle, Fires, and Fuels, Michael J. Jenkins, Justin B. Runyon, Christopher J. Fettig, Wesley G. Page, and Barbara J. Bentz; Forest Sciene

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Low-severity fires increase susceptibility of lodgepole pine to mountain pine beetle outbreaks in Colorado, Dominik Kulalowski and Daniel Jarvis; Forest Ecology and Management

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Modeling wind fields and fire propagation following bark beetle outbreaks in spatially-heterogeneous pinyon-juniper woodland fuel complexes, Rodman R. Linn, Carolyn H. Sieg, Chad M. Hoffman, Judith L. WInterkamp, and Joel D. McMillin; Agricultural and Forest Meteorology

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Wildfire’s resistance to control in mountain pine beetle-attacked lodgepole pine forests, Wesley G. Page, Martin E. Alexander, and Michael J. Jenkins; THe Forestry Chronicle

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Foliar moisture content variations in lodgepole pine over the diurnal cycle during the red stage of mountain pine beetle attack, Wesley G. Page, Michael J. Jenkins, and Martin E. Alexander; Environmental Modelling & Software