Bark beetle outbreaks have resulted in the loss of hundreds of thousands of conifers on approximately 30 million hectares of forested lands in western North America during the last decade. Many forests remain susceptible to bark beetle infestation and will continue to experience high levels of conifer mortality until suitable host trees are depleted, or natural factors cause populations to collapse. Stand conditions and drought, combined with warming temperatures, have contributed to the severity of these outbreaks, particularly in high-elevation forests.

Conventional wisdom suggests that large scale bark beetle outbreaks alter fuel complexes resulting in an increased potential for severe fires. Conversely, fires damage trees that may predispose them to bark beetle attack. In reality there is little specific quantified data supporting these assertions, and until recently, relationships between fire and western bark beetles in forests of North America have not been extensively studied. The magnitude of recent outbreaks and large wildfires has resulted in a flurry of research attempting to quantify bark beetle/fire/fuel interactions.
 
We hope and expect that our freely accessible, online bibliography may be of great benefit to any scholarly research. The bibliography searching can be conducted through titles, by author name, or by descriptive words. Where possible, full text of the documents are provided as PDF documents.

Get the The Bark Beetles, Fuels, and Fire Bibliography RSS feed

Subscribe to our feed

To enable the The Bark Beetles, Fuels, and Fire Bibliography RSS feed, simply drag this link into your RSS reader.

Follow

1999

Link

The Spruce Beetle, E H. Holsten, R W. Their, A S. Munson, and K E. Gibson; Forest Insect and Disease Leaflet

Link

Model Analysis of Mountain Pine Beetle (Coleoptera : Scolytidae) Seasonality, Jesse A. Logan and Barbara J. Bentz; Environmental Entomology

Link

Estimating Extent of Mortality Associated with the Douglas-Fir Beetle in the Central and Northern Rockies, Jose F. Negron, Willis C. Schaupp Jr., Kenneth E. Gibson, John Anhold, Dawn Hansen, Ralph Thier, and Phil Mocettini; Western Journal of Applied Forestry

Link

Plant-pest interactions in time and space: A Douglas-fir bark beetle outbreak as a case study, J. S. Powers, P. Sollins, M. E. Harmon, and J. A. Jones; Landscape Ecology

Link

Douglas-Fir Beetle in the Intermountain West, USDA Forest Service

1998

Link

The landscape ecology of western forest fire regimes, J. K. Agee; Northwest Science

Link

Current and Proposed Technologies for Bark Beetle Management, Richard A. Goyer, Michael R. Wagner, and Timothy D. Schowalter; Journal of Forestry

Link

Postfire Succession and Disturbance Interactions on an Intermountain Subalpine Spruce-Fir Forest, Michael J. Jenkins, Christopher A. Dicus, and Elizabeth G. Hebertson; Fire in Ecosystem Management : Shifting the Paradigm from Suppression to Prescription

Link

Fire and Insects in Northern and Boreal Forest Ecosystems on North America, Deborah G. McCullough, Richard A. Werner, and David Neumann; Annual Review of Entomology

Link

Probability of infestation and extent of mortality associated with the Douglas-fir beetle in the Colorado Front Range, J. F. Negrón; Forest Ecology and Management

1997

Link

Fire episodes in the inland northwest (1540-1940) based on fire history data, Stephen W. Barrett, Stephen F. Arno, and James P. Menakis; USDA Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station, General Technical Report INT-GTR-370, 17 pp.

Link

Aerial and surface fuel consumption in crown fires, P. T. Call and F. A. Albini; International Journal of Wildland Fire

Link

Restoring Ecosystem Health in Ponderosa Pine Forests of the Southwest, W. Wallace Covington, Peter Z. Fule, Margaret M. Moore, Stephen C. Hart, Thomas E. Kolb, Joy N. Mast, Stephen S. Sackett, and Michael R. Wagner; Journal of Forestry

Link

Pine Engraver, Ips pini (Say), in the Western United States, Sandra J. Kegley, R. Ladd Livingston, and Kenneth E. Gibson; USDA Forest Service, Forest Insect and Disease Leaflet 122, 5 pp.

Link

Forest Resources of the Wasatch-Cache National Forest, Renee A. O'Brien and Reese Pope

Link

Interactions Among Scolytid Bark Beetles, Their Associated Fungi, and Live Host Conifers, T D. Paine, K F. Raffa, and T C. Harrington; Annual Review of Entomology

Link

Using Pheromone-Baited Traps to Control the Amount and Distribution of Tree Mortality During Outbreaks of the Douglas-Fir Beetle, Darrell W. Ross and Gary E. Daterman; Forest Science

1996

Link

Management of Lodgepole Pine Stand Density to Reduce Susceptibility to Mountain Pine Beetle Attack, J A. Anhold, M J. Jenkins, and J N. Long; Western Journal of Applied Forestry

Link

Salvage Timber Sales and Forest Health, Ross W. Gorte

Link

Bark Beetle and Wood Borer Infestation in the Greater Yellowstone Area During Four Postfire Years, Lynn A. Rasmussem, Gene D. Amman, James C. Vandygriff, Robert D. Oakes, A. Steven Munson, and Kenneth E. Gibson

Link

Bark Beetle Activity and Delayed Tree Mortality in the Greater Yellowstone Area Following the 1988 Fires, Kevin C. Ryan and Gene D. Amman; Ecological Implications of Fire in Greater Yellowstone Proceedings

PDF

Douglas-Fir Beetle, Richard F. Schmitz and Kenneth E. Gibson; Forest Insect and Disease Leaflet

Link

Response of understory vegetation to variable tree mortality following a mountain pine beetle epidemic in lodgepole pine stands in northern Utah, William E. Stone and Michael L. Wolfe; Plant Ecology

Link

Historical Fire Regime Patterns in the Southwestern United States Since AD 1700, Thomas W. Swetnam and Christopher H. Baisan; Fire Effects in Southwestern Fortest : Proceedings of the 2nd La Mesa Fire Symposium

Link

Fire Frequency and the Vegetative Mosiac of a Spruce-Fir Forest in Northern Utah, Linda Wadleigh and Michael J. Jenkins; Great Basin Naturalist