Event Title

Got Groundwater?

Presenter Information

Todd Jarvis

Location

LaSells Stewart Center

Event Website

http://uenr.forestry.oregonstate.edu/

Start Date

14-3-2008 12:45 PM

End Date

14-3-2008 12:54 PM

Description

Approximately 40 to 50% of Oregon’s population relies on groundwater for drinking water. Groundwater supplies 90% of rural residential drinking water, amounting to approximately 400,000 Oregonians using individual home water wells. Of the 3,550 public water supply systems existing in Oregon, approximately 3,050 rely strictly on groundwater. The vast majority of Measure 49 claims (to subdivide rural lands) are located outside of Urban Growth Boundaries (UGBs). The claims, if approved and built as outlined in the respective applications, will result in low-density, large-lot houses relying on individual wells rather than by community water systems found within UBGs. Counties are increasingly taking the lead on the nexus between land use and water quantity; some are requiring pumping tests to *prove* that proposed subdivisions have sufficient quantities of groundwater prior to county approvals and permits. The Institute for Water & Watersheds has developed many learning tools to cater to growing needs for knowledge on groundwater resources by the increasing number of groundwater users. Many of these rely on linking groundwater to every day use of groundwater by consumers in products and foods like bottled water, and linking water problems to *place*. The tools have been used in audiences ranging from K-Gray as well as local government.

Comments

Poster presentation for 7th Biennial Conference on University Education in Natural Resources, March 13-15, 2008, Corvallis, Oregon. Featured in the ScholarsArchive@OSU in Oregon State University. Suggested Citation: Jarvis, Todd. 2008. Got groundwater. UENR 7th Biennial Conference, ScholarsArchive at Oregon State University. http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/xmlui/handle/1957/8332.

 
Mar 14th, 12:45 PM Mar 14th, 12:54 PM

Got Groundwater?

LaSells Stewart Center

Approximately 40 to 50% of Oregon’s population relies on groundwater for drinking water. Groundwater supplies 90% of rural residential drinking water, amounting to approximately 400,000 Oregonians using individual home water wells. Of the 3,550 public water supply systems existing in Oregon, approximately 3,050 rely strictly on groundwater. The vast majority of Measure 49 claims (to subdivide rural lands) are located outside of Urban Growth Boundaries (UGBs). The claims, if approved and built as outlined in the respective applications, will result in low-density, large-lot houses relying on individual wells rather than by community water systems found within UBGs. Counties are increasingly taking the lead on the nexus between land use and water quantity; some are requiring pumping tests to *prove* that proposed subdivisions have sufficient quantities of groundwater prior to county approvals and permits. The Institute for Water & Watersheds has developed many learning tools to cater to growing needs for knowledge on groundwater resources by the increasing number of groundwater users. Many of these rely on linking groundwater to every day use of groundwater by consumers in products and foods like bottled water, and linking water problems to *place*. The tools have been used in audiences ranging from K-Gray as well as local government.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/7thBiennial/Posters/2