Event Title

Collaborative Resource Education and Stewardship in Northeastern Nevada

Presenter Information

Kent McAdoo
Leta Collord
Gerald Miller

Location

Peavy/Richardson Halls

Event Website

http://uenr.forestry.oregonstate.edu/

Start Date

15-3-2008 2:30 PM

End Date

15-3-2008 3:00 PM

Description

In 1999, the Northeastern Nevada Stewardship Group (NNSG) formed as the result of frustrated citizens and agency representatives seeking common ground and collaborative resource stewardship alternatives. The NNSG is a diverse, community-based group that includes area ranchers, miners, conservationists, outdoor recreationists, businessmen, federal and state agency representatives, county commissioners, and other interested citizens. In part, the group’s goals are to: (1) provide a community forum for scientific information/education related to healthy ecosystems and issue resolution through the collaborative process; and (2) develop sustainable relationships and expectations that reduce conflicts, simplify and streamline planning, and provide multiple use opportunities. In addition to regular membership meetings on various natural resource topics, the group has hosted 21 symposia and workshops. An impact evaluation survey of NNSG members (n = 31, response rate = 64%) for a 5-year evaluation period showed the following based on a 5-point Likert scale (1 = unsuccessful, 5 = very successful): building trust and respect among the NNSG constituency, 4.3; providing a community forum for education, 4.7; working to reduce conflicts, 4.0. In 2004, the NNSG’s Sage Grouse Committee finalized the Elko County Sagebrush Ecosystem Conservation Strategy, NNSG’s flagship project for several years and a galvanizing force within the organization. In 2006, the NNSG received a grant for $153,530 to hire a project coordinator for conducting watershed-scale assessments basic to improving habitat for sage grouse and other sagebrush habitat obligates/associates. The NNSG has been recognized nationally, having received five awards for collaborative work on natural resource issues, including the BLM Director’s 4-C’s Award for “Making the World a Better Place through Consultation, Cooperation, Communication, and Conservation.”

Comments

Session #9: ICollaboration and Experiential Learning. Presentation for 7th Biennial Conference on University Education in Natural Resources, March 13-15, 2008, Corvallis, Oregon. Featured in the ScholarsArchive@OSU in Oregon State University. Suggested Citation: McAdoo, Kent et al. 2008. Collaborative resource education and stewardship in northeastern Nevada. UENR 7th Biennial Conference, ScholarsArchive at Oregon State University. http://hdl.handle.net/1957/8332

 
Mar 15th, 2:30 PM Mar 15th, 3:00 PM

Collaborative Resource Education and Stewardship in Northeastern Nevada

Peavy/Richardson Halls

In 1999, the Northeastern Nevada Stewardship Group (NNSG) formed as the result of frustrated citizens and agency representatives seeking common ground and collaborative resource stewardship alternatives. The NNSG is a diverse, community-based group that includes area ranchers, miners, conservationists, outdoor recreationists, businessmen, federal and state agency representatives, county commissioners, and other interested citizens. In part, the group’s goals are to: (1) provide a community forum for scientific information/education related to healthy ecosystems and issue resolution through the collaborative process; and (2) develop sustainable relationships and expectations that reduce conflicts, simplify and streamline planning, and provide multiple use opportunities. In addition to regular membership meetings on various natural resource topics, the group has hosted 21 symposia and workshops. An impact evaluation survey of NNSG members (n = 31, response rate = 64%) for a 5-year evaluation period showed the following based on a 5-point Likert scale (1 = unsuccessful, 5 = very successful): building trust and respect among the NNSG constituency, 4.3; providing a community forum for education, 4.7; working to reduce conflicts, 4.0. In 2004, the NNSG’s Sage Grouse Committee finalized the Elko County Sagebrush Ecosystem Conservation Strategy, NNSG’s flagship project for several years and a galvanizing force within the organization. In 2006, the NNSG received a grant for $153,530 to hire a project coordinator for conducting watershed-scale assessments basic to improving habitat for sage grouse and other sagebrush habitat obligates/associates. The NNSG has been recognized nationally, having received five awards for collaborative work on natural resource issues, including the BLM Director’s 4-C’s Award for “Making the World a Better Place through Consultation, Cooperation, Communication, and Conservation.”

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/7thBiennial/Sessions/35