Event Title

Forestry Education in the United States for the 21st Century: Round I

Location

Peavy/Richardson Halls

Event Website

http://uenr.forestry.oregonstate.edu/

Start Date

15-3-2008 1:30 PM

End Date

15-3-2008 3:00 PM

Description

The Society of American Foresters has played an integral role in formal forestry education over the last century, including three major studies of forestry education in America: Graves and Guise’s (1932) Forest Education, Chapman’s (1935) Professional Forestry Schools Report, and Dana and Johnson’s (1963) Forestry Education in America. Over 40 years have passed since SAF conducted a comprehensive look at forestry education in America. Many of the issues and discussions concerning the formal education of a forester remain the same: scope of the field, the increased body of scientific information, number of hours or years needed to produce a competent forester, and the number and types of classes devoted to general and/or technical education. However, though there are still similar issues and concerns, the programs and curricula reflect changes brought by cultural, educational, and technological influences over that time. SAF’s second century of involvement in the formal education process makes now an opportune time to produce an update on forestry education in America. The Forestry Education in North America for the 21st Century is a multi-tiered, multi-faceted study to capture the depth and breadth of SAF accredited baccalaureate programs in their current states. This session informs about the scheduled process and methods of the study, provides preliminary results of the first-tier web survey, and solicits discussion. In addition, a roundtable protocol will encourage UENR attendees to provide input concerning information needs for the subsequent data collection from forestry programs, practicing foresters, and industry.

Comments

Session #9: Increasing Diversity and Inclusion. Presentation for 7th Biennial Conference on University Education in Natural Resources, March 13-15, 2008, Corvallis, Oregon. Featured in the ScholarsArchive@OSU in Oregon State University. Suggested Citation: Williams, Pat Stephens, et. al. 2008. Forestry education in the United States for the 21st century: Round I. UENR 7th Biennial Conference, ScholarsArchive at Oregon State University. http://hdl.handle.net/1957/8332

 
Mar 15th, 1:30 PM Mar 15th, 3:00 PM

Forestry Education in the United States for the 21st Century: Round I

Peavy/Richardson Halls

The Society of American Foresters has played an integral role in formal forestry education over the last century, including three major studies of forestry education in America: Graves and Guise’s (1932) Forest Education, Chapman’s (1935) Professional Forestry Schools Report, and Dana and Johnson’s (1963) Forestry Education in America. Over 40 years have passed since SAF conducted a comprehensive look at forestry education in America. Many of the issues and discussions concerning the formal education of a forester remain the same: scope of the field, the increased body of scientific information, number of hours or years needed to produce a competent forester, and the number and types of classes devoted to general and/or technical education. However, though there are still similar issues and concerns, the programs and curricula reflect changes brought by cultural, educational, and technological influences over that time. SAF’s second century of involvement in the formal education process makes now an opportune time to produce an update on forestry education in America. The Forestry Education in North America for the 21st Century is a multi-tiered, multi-faceted study to capture the depth and breadth of SAF accredited baccalaureate programs in their current states. This session informs about the scheduled process and methods of the study, provides preliminary results of the first-tier web survey, and solicits discussion. In addition, a roundtable protocol will encourage UENR attendees to provide input concerning information needs for the subsequent data collection from forestry programs, practicing foresters, and industry.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/7thBiennial/Sessions/39