Location

Green and Gold Room

Event Website

http://uenr.warnercnr.colostate.edu/

Start Date

23-3-2012 10:50 AM

End Date

23-3-2012 11:30 AM

Description

This session will discuss initiatives the College of Natural Resources (CNR) at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point (UWSP) is taking to increase the number of students from ethnically diverse backgrounds entering the college. The CNR has roughly 1600 declared majors but less than 4% are students of color (and 28% female). This poses a significant problem for many reasons. As many are aware, natural resources management and policy decisions are currently based on a small set of experiences within our population, mainly that of the white perspective. As minority numbers continue to increase in the US and our country becomes more urbanized, the number of people who engage in hunting and fishing will likely decrease if all ethnic groups are not engaged. In addition, the right to utilize, enjoy and benefit from protected natural areas and to have access to clean communities should be available to all US citizens. Statistically, fewer minorities regularly engage in outdoor experiences like camping, hiking, hunting, fishing and visiting national parks. Communities are also more likely to be polluted or unsafe if they are in the inner city or where there is higher poverty, both of which often have higher minority populations. As a result, the CNR is receiving more requests from the federal, state, county and private agencies for qualified students of color to intern and later work in their departments. These agencies are also anxious to increase diversity numbers in terms of who is making the natural resources management decisions and participating in recreational opportunities. Because of these reasons, it is imperative that we have an open dialogue about attracting and retaining qualified students of diverse backgrounds to this field.

Comments

Citation: Kubish, Bobbi. 2012. Initiatives to Increase Ethnic Diversity in Natural Resources Majors at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resources. UENR 9th Biennial Conference. http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/9thBiennial/Sessions/1/

 
Mar 23rd, 10:50 AM Mar 23rd, 11:30 AM

Initiatives to Increase Ethnic Diversity in Natural Resources Majors at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resources

Green and Gold Room

This session will discuss initiatives the College of Natural Resources (CNR) at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point (UWSP) is taking to increase the number of students from ethnically diverse backgrounds entering the college. The CNR has roughly 1600 declared majors but less than 4% are students of color (and 28% female). This poses a significant problem for many reasons. As many are aware, natural resources management and policy decisions are currently based on a small set of experiences within our population, mainly that of the white perspective. As minority numbers continue to increase in the US and our country becomes more urbanized, the number of people who engage in hunting and fishing will likely decrease if all ethnic groups are not engaged. In addition, the right to utilize, enjoy and benefit from protected natural areas and to have access to clean communities should be available to all US citizens. Statistically, fewer minorities regularly engage in outdoor experiences like camping, hiking, hunting, fishing and visiting national parks. Communities are also more likely to be polluted or unsafe if they are in the inner city or where there is higher poverty, both of which often have higher minority populations. As a result, the CNR is receiving more requests from the federal, state, county and private agencies for qualified students of color to intern and later work in their departments. These agencies are also anxious to increase diversity numbers in terms of who is making the natural resources management decisions and participating in recreational opportunities. Because of these reasons, it is imperative that we have an open dialogue about attracting and retaining qualified students of diverse backgrounds to this field.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/9thBiennial/Plenary/1