Location

Green and Gold Room

Event Website

http://uenr.warnercnr.colostate.edu

Start Date

23-3-2012 4:35 PM

End Date

23-3-2012 4:55 PM

Description

Internship and experiential learning programs are compared between The University of Rhode Island (URI), Department of Natural Resources Science (1992-1996), and Texas Tech University (TTU), Department of Natural Resources Management (1997-current) through the periods in which I was associated with them. I review and compare the kinds of administrative support and faculty involvement, the numbers of students and kinds of opportunities provided in each program. Programs differed markedly: URI had invested faculty and support; whereas, TTU ‘encouraged’ students to participate. While data reported here does not account for differences due to regional or decadal influences, I illustrate that most differences occurred because of different faculty incentives, curricular emphases, and departmental objectives. I then conducted a survey and report on responses about the importance of these experiences from students who have been out of each of these school programs for > 10 years. Most students who participated in internships or experiential hands-on learning during their academic career said it was very important. Percentages of students who went on to be successful in a natural resource career was higher at URI. More of those graduates emphasized that the reason they made their career in the related natural resources fields was because of their internship or experiential experience while in school.

Comments

Citation: Wallace, MC. 2012. Dynamic Internship Programs: Comparison Between Two Universities. UENR 9th Biennial Conference. http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/9thBiennial/Plenary/14/

 
Mar 23rd, 4:35 PM Mar 23rd, 4:55 PM

Dynamic Internship Programs: Comparison Between Two Universities

Green and Gold Room

Internship and experiential learning programs are compared between The University of Rhode Island (URI), Department of Natural Resources Science (1992-1996), and Texas Tech University (TTU), Department of Natural Resources Management (1997-current) through the periods in which I was associated with them. I review and compare the kinds of administrative support and faculty involvement, the numbers of students and kinds of opportunities provided in each program. Programs differed markedly: URI had invested faculty and support; whereas, TTU ‘encouraged’ students to participate. While data reported here does not account for differences due to regional or decadal influences, I illustrate that most differences occurred because of different faculty incentives, curricular emphases, and departmental objectives. I then conducted a survey and report on responses about the importance of these experiences from students who have been out of each of these school programs for > 10 years. Most students who participated in internships or experiential hands-on learning during their academic career said it was very important. Percentages of students who went on to be successful in a natural resource career was higher at URI. More of those graduates emphasized that the reason they made their career in the related natural resources fields was because of their internship or experiential experience while in school.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/9thBiennial/Plenary/14