Location

Green and Gold Room

Event Website

http://uenr.warnercnr.colostate.edu/

Start Date

23-3-2012 9:30 AM

End Date

23-3-2012 10:10 AM

Description

Many agriculture and natural resources academic departments at southern land-grant institutions often have a difficult time attracting minority students directly from high schools. Resultantly, some have developed cooperative programs with related departments at historically black colleges and universities to help diversify their student body. Based on the course offerings at HBCUs, these programs usually require that students attend two to four semesters at the land-grant institution. These cooperative programs provide benefits to program students as well as the partner institutions, but also present unique challenges to advisors at the land-grant universities charged with mentoring these students. The objectives of this presentation are to 1) provide attendees with a brief background into the history of one such program, 2) describe the administrative issues involved with administering the program and its bearing on students such as admissions, class standing, and tuition waivers, and 3) discuss the educational and social challenges program students face prior to and during their tenure at the land-grant institution including academic preparedness, perceived discrimination, and developing a support network. Academic performance of program students will also be discussed as well as lessons learned from being a program advisor and working with program students in other minority recruiting endeavors.

Comments

Citation: Hunt, Kevin M. 2012. Recruiting and Advising Minority Students in Cooperative Land-Grant/HBCU Programs. UENR 9th Biennial Conference. http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/9thBiennial/Plenary/3/

 
Mar 23rd, 9:30 AM Mar 23rd, 10:10 AM

Recruiting and Advising Minority Students in Cooperative Land-Grant/HBCU Programs

Green and Gold Room

Many agriculture and natural resources academic departments at southern land-grant institutions often have a difficult time attracting minority students directly from high schools. Resultantly, some have developed cooperative programs with related departments at historically black colleges and universities to help diversify their student body. Based on the course offerings at HBCUs, these programs usually require that students attend two to four semesters at the land-grant institution. These cooperative programs provide benefits to program students as well as the partner institutions, but also present unique challenges to advisors at the land-grant universities charged with mentoring these students. The objectives of this presentation are to 1) provide attendees with a brief background into the history of one such program, 2) describe the administrative issues involved with administering the program and its bearing on students such as admissions, class standing, and tuition waivers, and 3) discuss the educational and social challenges program students face prior to and during their tenure at the land-grant institution including academic preparedness, perceived discrimination, and developing a support network. Academic performance of program students will also be discussed as well as lessons learned from being a program advisor and working with program students in other minority recruiting endeavors.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/9thBiennial/Plenary/3