Location

Legends Room

Event Website

http://uenr.warnercnr.colostate.edu/

Start Date

23-3-2012 10:50 AM

End Date

23-3-2012 11:30 AM

Description

Over the past 8 years faculty at UT Martin have experimented with various tools to deliver online content to students at a distance. The most common tool used by faculty is the use of a plug-in for PowerPoint that allows voice annotation of slides. These tools are effective at delivering materials that are in a traditional format with the instructor’s recorded voice. However, these types of tools do not allow you to develop dynamic mathematical problem solving examples for students without working out the problems in advance. The natural resource economics course, like most classes is dependent upon the ability to demonstrate mathematical problems and construct meaningful graphs to explain concepts. As a result of this need, faculty used Tablet PC technology along with a screen capture program to develop a pen-based solution for demonstrating math type problems to students. As technology changed and became less expensive new options became available that did not require a Tablet PC and a screen capture technology. Several UTM faculty tested digital pen products to determine the effectiveness for developing math type tutorials that included instructor voice. The latest generation of digital pen technology has been in place for the past 3 years. The important issue related to the use of the digital ink is its effectiveness at conveying information to students in an online learning environment and its acceptance among faculty. To answer these questions a survey of students (n=22) and faculty (n=27) was conducted to determine the effectiveness of the technology. Results of faculty surveys revealed that 84% of respondents indicated that the digital pen saved time when developing online course materials and that it enhanced their ability to convey information. The majority of faculty felt the technology had a minimal learning curve. Student surveys coupled with actual assignment and exam scores revealed that 90% of students who viewed the digital ink learning objects had a positive experience. The final exam scores of students who viewed the digital ink learning objects had a significantly higher final exam score than non-viewers in the same course.

Comments

Citation: Mehlhorn, JE et al. 2012. Teaching Natural Resource Economics with Digital Learning Objects: Evolution from Chalk to Digital Ink. UENR 9th Biennial Conference. http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/9thBiennial/Plenary/4/

 
Mar 23rd, 10:50 AM Mar 23rd, 11:30 AM

Teaching Natural Resource Economics with Digital Learning Objects: Evolution from Chalk to Digital Ink

Legends Room

Over the past 8 years faculty at UT Martin have experimented with various tools to deliver online content to students at a distance. The most common tool used by faculty is the use of a plug-in for PowerPoint that allows voice annotation of slides. These tools are effective at delivering materials that are in a traditional format with the instructor’s recorded voice. However, these types of tools do not allow you to develop dynamic mathematical problem solving examples for students without working out the problems in advance. The natural resource economics course, like most classes is dependent upon the ability to demonstrate mathematical problems and construct meaningful graphs to explain concepts. As a result of this need, faculty used Tablet PC technology along with a screen capture program to develop a pen-based solution for demonstrating math type problems to students. As technology changed and became less expensive new options became available that did not require a Tablet PC and a screen capture technology. Several UTM faculty tested digital pen products to determine the effectiveness for developing math type tutorials that included instructor voice. The latest generation of digital pen technology has been in place for the past 3 years. The important issue related to the use of the digital ink is its effectiveness at conveying information to students in an online learning environment and its acceptance among faculty. To answer these questions a survey of students (n=22) and faculty (n=27) was conducted to determine the effectiveness of the technology. Results of faculty surveys revealed that 84% of respondents indicated that the digital pen saved time when developing online course materials and that it enhanced their ability to convey information. The majority of faculty felt the technology had a minimal learning curve. Student surveys coupled with actual assignment and exam scores revealed that 90% of students who viewed the digital ink learning objects had a positive experience. The final exam scores of students who viewed the digital ink learning objects had a significantly higher final exam score than non-viewers in the same course.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/9thBiennial/Plenary/4