Location

Smyth 146

Event Website

http://www.cpe.vt.edu/cuenr/index.html

Start Date

27-3-2010 9:00 AM

End Date

27-3-2010 9:30 AM

Description

As universities look to innovative ideas during these lean economic times, more departments are offering distance learning courses as an attempt to bridge the gap in their budgetary shortfalls, through generating additional funding and increasing class sizes (Foster & Carnevale, 2007). Unfortunately many times, faculty simply transform a face‐to‐face course into a distance education (DE) course without truly understanding the need to change the pedagogy necessary for a successful DE course (Carnevale, 2000; Xenos, Avouris, Stavrinoudis, & Margaritis, 2009). The purpose of our presentation is to explore the value of distance education and to present the challenges involved with transforming face‐to‐face courses and activities for DE courses. Transforming a face‐to‐face class into a distance learning class is relatively simple for course content; however, making the distance learning class as interactive as the face‐to‐face class is more challenging. There are obstacles inherent to distance learning as it pertains to group activities, student input, class activities, and sense of community among students; however these obstacles can be eliminated with the use of creative solutions and through the use of technological innovations. For example, simulated face‐to‐face interactions can be created by using online communication software (e.g., Elluminate) for conducting a virtual classroom experience. Additionally, the appropriate IT support plays a key role in the successful development and implementation of activities for student engagement. Attendees will be shown the differences between synchronous and asynchronous methods for online teaching and be given specific examples from our previous experiences in DE courses. We will identify ways to modify face‐to‐face activities into DE activities that will cater to all types of learners, thus offering a richer learning experience. Participants are encouraged to bring their face‐to‐face course syllabi and activities/assignments to our presentation, as there will be an opportunity to develop an action plan for transforming face‐to‐ face course activities to DE, specific to their course needs. This workshop is not about technical issues, but tailored toward teaching staff wishing to gain a better understanding in developing online courses and student engagement through online activities. Outcomes Participants will be able to: • Identify the positives and negatives of student engagement with online learning • Identify IT support needed in providing quality online learning experiences • Develop potential synchronous and asynchronous online learning and teaching activities specific to course needs • Design an action plan for implementation of distance learning activities

Comments

Citation: Moretz, J.L., M.G. Harrolle. 2010. Transforming face to face activities into distance learning activities: increasing student engagement. UENR Biennial Conference, Session Distance Education, Paper Number 2. http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/Sessions/Distance/2/.

 
Mar 27th, 9:00 AM Mar 27th, 9:30 AM

Transforming Face ­to ­Face Activities into Distance Learning Activities: Increasing Student Engagement

Smyth 146

As universities look to innovative ideas during these lean economic times, more departments are offering distance learning courses as an attempt to bridge the gap in their budgetary shortfalls, through generating additional funding and increasing class sizes (Foster & Carnevale, 2007). Unfortunately many times, faculty simply transform a face‐to‐face course into a distance education (DE) course without truly understanding the need to change the pedagogy necessary for a successful DE course (Carnevale, 2000; Xenos, Avouris, Stavrinoudis, & Margaritis, 2009). The purpose of our presentation is to explore the value of distance education and to present the challenges involved with transforming face‐to‐face courses and activities for DE courses. Transforming a face‐to‐face class into a distance learning class is relatively simple for course content; however, making the distance learning class as interactive as the face‐to‐face class is more challenging. There are obstacles inherent to distance learning as it pertains to group activities, student input, class activities, and sense of community among students; however these obstacles can be eliminated with the use of creative solutions and through the use of technological innovations. For example, simulated face‐to‐face interactions can be created by using online communication software (e.g., Elluminate) for conducting a virtual classroom experience. Additionally, the appropriate IT support plays a key role in the successful development and implementation of activities for student engagement. Attendees will be shown the differences between synchronous and asynchronous methods for online teaching and be given specific examples from our previous experiences in DE courses. We will identify ways to modify face‐to‐face activities into DE activities that will cater to all types of learners, thus offering a richer learning experience. Participants are encouraged to bring their face‐to‐face course syllabi and activities/assignments to our presentation, as there will be an opportunity to develop an action plan for transforming face‐to‐ face course activities to DE, specific to their course needs. This workshop is not about technical issues, but tailored toward teaching staff wishing to gain a better understanding in developing online courses and student engagement through online activities. Outcomes Participants will be able to: • Identify the positives and negatives of student engagement with online learning • Identify IT support needed in providing quality online learning experiences • Develop potential synchronous and asynchronous online learning and teaching activities specific to course needs • Design an action plan for implementation of distance learning activities

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/Sessions/Distance/2