Event Title

Writing a Teaching Philosophy: Simplifying the Seemingly Impossible

Location

Engel 223

Event Website

http://www.cpe.vt.edu/cuenr/index.html

Start Date

27-3-2010 4:00 PM

End Date

27-3-2010 4:30 PM

Description

Writing a teaching philosophy can be a daunting task, regardless of whether you are a graduate student applying for a job, a young faculty member seeking promotion and tenure, or a grizzled veteran preparing for post‐tenure review. It needn’t be. Despite numerous guidebooks and internet pages devoted to this topic, it remains a mystery to most who stare at a blank page and find nothing staring back. The challenge is to de‐mystify the process. I believe that the key lies in identifying the barriers to getting started and in simplifying the task so that it seems manageable. In this presentation, I’ll share a process that has worked for me for nearly 20 years. It can be used by individuals, in small groups, or with a class of 30‐50 students. I’ll model how I would present it in a class, and then give those in the audience a chance to get started writing their own teaching philosophy—one that is simple, concise, and meaningful to them.

Comments

Citation: Jensen, E.C. 2010. Writing a teaching philosophy: simplifying the seemingly impossible. UENR Biennial Conference, Session Innovations in Pedagogy-General, Paper Number 2. http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/Sessions/Pedagogy/2/.

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Mar 27th, 4:00 PM Mar 27th, 4:30 PM

Writing a Teaching Philosophy: Simplifying the Seemingly Impossible

Engel 223

Writing a teaching philosophy can be a daunting task, regardless of whether you are a graduate student applying for a job, a young faculty member seeking promotion and tenure, or a grizzled veteran preparing for post‐tenure review. It needn’t be. Despite numerous guidebooks and internet pages devoted to this topic, it remains a mystery to most who stare at a blank page and find nothing staring back. The challenge is to de‐mystify the process. I believe that the key lies in identifying the barriers to getting started and in simplifying the task so that it seems manageable. In this presentation, I’ll share a process that has worked for me for nearly 20 years. It can be used by individuals, in small groups, or with a class of 30‐50 students. I’ll model how I would present it in a class, and then give those in the audience a chance to get started writing their own teaching philosophy—one that is simple, concise, and meaningful to them.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/Sessions/Pedagogy/2