Document Type

Book Review

Journal/Book Title/Conference

ARIEL: A Review of International English Literature

Volume

38

Issue

4

Publication Date

10-2007

First Page

169

Last Page

173

Abstract

The negritude movement had Présence Africaine; the Harlem Renaissance had Crisis and Opportunity; South African writers of the 1950s had Drum magazine. Paul Gready has written that Drum’s “flashy muck-raking journalistic style attempted to capture the vivid life of the townships. Drum became a symbol of a new urban South Africa” (146); for Rob Nixon, it “amplified the voices of a defiantly impure cosmopolitanism, projecting an urban look and ethos” (28). Lewis Nkosi, who went to work for the magazine in 1957, said that Drum “wasn’t so much a magazine as it was a symbol of the new African cut adrift from the tribal reserve—urbanised, eager, fast-talking and brash" (Home and Exile 8) The magazine serialized novels by Alan Paton and Peter Abrahams, and occasionally published the work of black American writers like Langston Hughes.