Date of Award:

1970

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Psychology

Advisor/Chair:

Elwin C. Nielsen

Abstract

The American College Testing Program's Institutional Self-Study Survey was used in this study to consider USU students' goals, achievements, and evaluations of their collegiate experience. Goals included were students' educational majors, vocational plans, final college degree sought, and the relative importance attached to attaining Vocational, Academic, Social, and Non-Conventional goals. Achievements studied were both intellectual and nonacademic out-of-class accomplishments, and students' perceived progress in achieving Intellectual-Humanistic, Group-Welfare, Scientific-Independent, and Practical-status outcomes of their collegiate experience. Student evaluations of instructors, college services, selected policies, practices, facilities, and required courses were also studied. National normative data were compared with USU data in all areas of the study. Compared with the national norms, USU student goals were found to be directed toward attaining specific vocational skills and less toward postgraduate training. USU students were generally found to have more achievements in both intellectual and non-academic areas. They rated college services, rules governing students, and academic facilities highly; instructors comparable to other universities; and cultural programs and recreational facilities relatively low.