Date of Award:

2000

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Psychology

Advisor/Chair:

Susan L. Crowley

Abstract

Children have not historically been the subject of research focusing on internalizing disorders (i.e., childhood depression), even though childhood depression continues to be viewed as one of the most prevalent affective problem within this population. Over the past two decades, a small portion of that literature describes prevention efforts in public schools. There has been a growing body of literature centered on childhood depression. However, there are only three studies that report on longitudinal findings that have taken a primary prevention approach.

The present study was a follow-up investigation to delineate the effects of a school-based primary prevention program. The original study utilized a social/ interpersonal and cognitive-behavioral model incorporated into the health education curriculum of the school.

The results of the study suggest that the students continued to report normal to low levels of depressive symptoms at one-year follow-up . The results also suggest that students maintained the social skills gained during the intervention at the one-year followup. In addition, reports of depressive symptomatology slightly declined from posttest to one-year follow-up.

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