Date of Award:

1979

Document Type:

Dissertation

Degree Name:

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department:

Psychology

Department name when degree awarded

Curriculum Development and Supervision with a Special Emphasis in Secondary Education

Advisor/Chair:

Glendon Casto

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine if any significant difference existed between kibbutz and city children in terms of their concept of family and concept of self within the family.

The subjects chosen for the investigation consisted of 51 pupils in the third and fourth grades from two communities in Israel. The two communities were a kibbutz community and a middle class small suburb community. Raw score data were obtained for the investigation from two testing devices. The Draw-A-Family Test (DAF) was used here in order to gain insight to the subjects' perception of the two concepts under investigation; the written attitude test was constructed in order to gain broader understanding of the subjects' concepts under study. Three raters were used in order to analyze the data obtained from the DAF Test. Interrater reliability coefficient was computed using the Pearson Product Coefficient technique. Using the nonparamatic chi square technique, a comparison was made of the two subject groups' responses to each individual item on the DAF Test and on the written attitude test. Validation of findings on the DAF Test were done by using the Pearson Correlation Coefficient technique. With the use of the same statistical technique, a further comparison was made of subjects' responses to items on the DAF Test which were designed to measure the same concepts. Using the Mann Whitney Q Test between groups, a statistical comparison of the two groups' responses to each of the testing devices was conducted.

  1. An analysis of subject responses on the DAF Test showed significant difference between the two groups' concepts of family and of self within the family. Drawings produced for this study by the kibbutz children reflected a significantly more positive view of the concepts under observation.
  2. Statistical analysis of the reliability of the DAF Test demonstrated high correlation between items dealing with the same concepts.
  3. No significant difference between the two groups' concepts of family and of self within the family was found in the statistical analysis of subjects' responses to the written attitude test. However, subjects' unexpected added responses to the written attitude test were interpreted as being supportive of the difference found in the DAF Test.
  4. Statistical analysis of relations between the two testing devices showed low negative correlation between the DAF Test and the written attitude test.
  5. Investigation of subjects' responses on both tests were interpreted as reflecting (a) low variability in subjects' responses to the written attitude test within and between groups and (b) broad variability in subjects' responses to the DAF Test within and between groups.

The conclusions based on the findings of the study were that (1) the two measuring tools used in this study (graphic and verbal) measured different aspects of the concepts under study. It seemed to the investigator that the written attitude test measured primarily the conscious level of the subjects' concepts while the DAF Test seemed to reveal primarily information about the unconscious level of the subjects' concepts. (2) Subjects' responses to the DAF Test were interpreted to demonstrate the positive effect of kibbutz lifestyle on children's formation of the unconscious aspect of concepts of family and of self within the family. (3) Subjects' responses on the written attitude test were interpreted to demonstrate that the kibbutz lifestyle did not seem to differ from the middle class suburb city lifestyle in its affect upon the formation of the conscious level of the concepts of family and of self within the family.

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Psychology Commons

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