Date of Award:

Summer 5-2017

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Political Science

Department name when degree awarded

Political Science

Advisor/Chair:

Damon Cann

Co-Advisor/Chair:

Randy Simmons

Third Advisor:

Josh Ryan

Abstract

Since the progressive era, American cities have generally expanded their authority in policymaking and service provision. State governments have at times acted to preempt city authority on particular points of policy, but it is unclear whether the threat of this action inspires caution in the decision making of city leaders. The results of an experimental survey distributed to elected city officials across the United States show that a perceived threat of preemption does not significantly discourage city leaders in supporting a proposed broadband internet service provision. These results suggest that political pressure in the form of preemption is not persuasive to city leaders, and that local representational interests are likely more influential on municipal government.

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