Date of Award

2005

Degree Type

Report

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Civil and Environmental Engineering

First Advisor

William Rahmeyer

Abstract

This paper focuses on a canal in the Gunnison Valley, located in central Utah, which diverts water from the sediment-laden Green River. Grain size analyses were performed on sediment samples taken from the canal. These grain size analyses were used to determine the grain size distribution of the fine sediment, classify the fine sediment, and compare the fine sediment to a sediment deposit in the Green River. The critical incipient velocity for the D50 and D100 and the critical grain entrainment velocity corresponding to the D95 were determined through flume experimentation. Two methods, developed by prior researchers, were chosen by the author to calculate the critical incipient velocity for the D50 and D100 of the fine sediment in the Green River Canal. The calculated critical incipient velocity for the D50 and D100 was compared to the critical incipient velocity for the D50 and D100 as determined from flume experimentation. Using flume data and one of the previously mentioned methods, the critical grain entrainment velocity was calculated and compared to the critical grain entrainment velocity as determined by flume experimentation. This study concluded that a minimum required average velocity of 1.14 feet per second will retain in suspension the fine sediment sampled from the Green River Canal. This minimum average critical grain entrainment velocity corresponds to the D95 of the fine sediment deposited in the Green River Canal. However, it is recommended that further research be conducted to determine if critical incipient velocity formulae accurately estimates the critical grain entrainment velocity. If so, the further research should address the grain diameter that should be used in the calculations.

Share

COinS