Location

Portland, OR

Start Date

28-6-2016 4:00 PM

End Date

28-6-2016 6:00 PM

DOI

doi:10.15142/T3560628160853

Description

One of the initial constraints of any dredging project is deciding where to place dredged material. When placed upland, materials can be used beneficially, as beach nourishment or for habitat restoration, or can be placed in an upland confined disposal facility (CDF). Several times the solids volume in water is required to fluidized and hydraulically pump the materials. Once in the CDF, materials settle out of suspension, with clarified water decanted. This paper describes in general a current weir design used by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and illustrates the innovations of the new Jacksonville District standard weir. The new outfall structure is safer, easier to construct, and has inherent environmental protection features. It also has a longer life cycle and lower lifecycle cost than traditional structures. This paper also discusses a new composite weir system that is in the patent and construction phase. These new corrosion-resistant systems have the capability of revolutionizing and standardizing water control structures due to basic changes in material selection and operational controls. The construction, management, and maintenance of weir systems are a significant cost incurred by USACE navigation projects; improved systems are available that can reduce maintenance costs while improving the safety of personnel who operate them.

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Jun 28th, 4:00 PM Jun 28th, 6:00 PM

Confined Disposal Facility Improved Weir Designs

Portland, OR

One of the initial constraints of any dredging project is deciding where to place dredged material. When placed upland, materials can be used beneficially, as beach nourishment or for habitat restoration, or can be placed in an upland confined disposal facility (CDF). Several times the solids volume in water is required to fluidized and hydraulically pump the materials. Once in the CDF, materials settle out of suspension, with clarified water decanted. This paper describes in general a current weir design used by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and illustrates the innovations of the new Jacksonville District standard weir. The new outfall structure is safer, easier to construct, and has inherent environmental protection features. It also has a longer life cycle and lower lifecycle cost than traditional structures. This paper also discusses a new composite weir system that is in the patent and construction phase. These new corrosion-resistant systems have the capability of revolutionizing and standardizing water control structures due to basic changes in material selection and operational controls. The construction, management, and maintenance of weir systems are a significant cost incurred by USACE navigation projects; improved systems are available that can reduce maintenance costs while improving the safety of personnel who operate them.