Event Title

Determining a Mixed-Severity Fire Regime for Appalachian Yellow Pine Stands Using Dendroecological Analysis

Event Website

http://www.nafew2009.org/

Start Date

22-6-2009 10:30 AM

End Date

22-6-2009 10:50 AM

Description

Yellow pine stands in the central and southern Appalachian Mountains are dependent on fire for their existence, but the exact nature of that fire regime is unclear. In 1999, we conducted a dendroecology study of nine yellow pine stands in northern Georgia, western South Carolina, and eastern Tennessee to determine the historic fire regime. Analysis showed that during the 1800s, yellow pine stands were uneven-aged and maintained by a mix of variable-intensity surface fires caused by lightning and canopy disturbances. However, many became even-aged in the 1900s when high-intensity fires caused stand replacement. Forest managers wishing to restore yellow pine stands in the Appalachian Mountains need to mimic the 1800s mixed-severity fire regime in their management plans and prescriptions.

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Jun 22nd, 10:30 AM Jun 22nd, 10:50 AM

Determining a Mixed-Severity Fire Regime for Appalachian Yellow Pine Stands Using Dendroecological Analysis

Yellow pine stands in the central and southern Appalachian Mountains are dependent on fire for their existence, but the exact nature of that fire regime is unclear. In 1999, we conducted a dendroecology study of nine yellow pine stands in northern Georgia, western South Carolina, and eastern Tennessee to determine the historic fire regime. Analysis showed that during the 1800s, yellow pine stands were uneven-aged and maintained by a mix of variable-intensity surface fires caused by lightning and canopy disturbances. However, many became even-aged in the 1900s when high-intensity fires caused stand replacement. Forest managers wishing to restore yellow pine stands in the Appalachian Mountains need to mimic the 1800s mixed-severity fire regime in their management plans and prescriptions.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nafecology/sessions/fire_effects/6