Event Title

Carbon Flux of Down Woody Materials in Forests of the North Central United States

Presenter Information

C. Woodall, Forest Service

Event Website

http://www.nafew2009.org/

Start Date

25-6-2009 10:30 AM

End Date

25-6-2009 10:50 AM

Description

Down woody materials (DWM) are a detrital forest ecosystem component that offset approximately 1 percent of annual CO2 emissions in the US. Across large-scales, DWM carbon (C) flux has only been simulated based on forest stand attributes (e.g., stand age and forest type). In order to provide an initial assessment of DWM C flux across large-scales, the annual change in fine and coarse woody C stocks and other attributes (e.g., coarse woody volume change) was assessed for forests in the north central United States. Using DWM inventory data from the USDA Forest Service’s Forest Inventory and Analysis program, it was found that DWM C stocks decreased across the study region at an average annual rate of 0.3 tonnes/ha (emission). Flux rates varied both in their amount and status (emission/sequestration) by forest types, latitude, and DWM component size. The decay of large fine and coarse woody debris without recruitment of freshly fallen pieces may explain the loss of DWM and emission of C. Given the differences in sample designs, early implementation of change estimation algorithms, and relatively low sample size, numerous future research directions are suggested.

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Jun 25th, 10:30 AM Jun 25th, 10:50 AM

Carbon Flux of Down Woody Materials in Forests of the North Central United States

Down woody materials (DWM) are a detrital forest ecosystem component that offset approximately 1 percent of annual CO2 emissions in the US. Across large-scales, DWM carbon (C) flux has only been simulated based on forest stand attributes (e.g., stand age and forest type). In order to provide an initial assessment of DWM C flux across large-scales, the annual change in fine and coarse woody C stocks and other attributes (e.g., coarse woody volume change) was assessed for forests in the north central United States. Using DWM inventory data from the USDA Forest Service’s Forest Inventory and Analysis program, it was found that DWM C stocks decreased across the study region at an average annual rate of 0.3 tonnes/ha (emission). Flux rates varied both in their amount and status (emission/sequestration) by forest types, latitude, and DWM component size. The decay of large fine and coarse woody debris without recruitment of freshly fallen pieces may explain the loss of DWM and emission of C. Given the differences in sample designs, early implementation of change estimation algorithms, and relatively low sample size, numerous future research directions are suggested.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nafecology/sessions/forest_detritus/4