Event Title

Soil Temperatures During Fires in Florida Sand Pine Scrub

Event Website

http://www.nafew2009.org/

Start Date

25-6-2009 9:00 AM

End Date

25-6-2009 9:20 AM

Description

Soil temperatures recorded with thermocouples and temperature-sensitive paints on glass petri dishes were quantified during two Florida sand pine scrub prescribed fires during May 1993. Thermocouples and petri dishes were placed either at the soil surface or at 2 cm depth, and either in vegetated or open microsites. Maximum soil surface temperatures were 621.7o C and 628.8o C during fires at Archbold Biological Station and Ocala National Forest, respectively; maximum temperatures at 2 cm depth were less than half of those at the surface. Peak temperature durations also were shorter at the soil surface than at 2 cm depth. Temperatures recorded with thermocouples did not differ between microsites during the Ocala fire, but were higher in open microsites during the Archbold Biological Station fire, probably due to combustion of well-aerated litter. Maximum temperatures of petri dishes generally were lower than those of adjacent thermocouples, due to a greater lag time in melting of temperature-sensitive paints on petri dishes.

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Jun 25th, 9:00 AM Jun 25th, 9:20 AM

Soil Temperatures During Fires in Florida Sand Pine Scrub

Soil temperatures recorded with thermocouples and temperature-sensitive paints on glass petri dishes were quantified during two Florida sand pine scrub prescribed fires during May 1993. Thermocouples and petri dishes were placed either at the soil surface or at 2 cm depth, and either in vegetated or open microsites. Maximum soil surface temperatures were 621.7o C and 628.8o C during fires at Archbold Biological Station and Ocala National Forest, respectively; maximum temperatures at 2 cm depth were less than half of those at the surface. Peak temperature durations also were shorter at the soil surface than at 2 cm depth. Temperatures recorded with thermocouples did not differ between microsites during the Ocala fire, but were higher in open microsites during the Archbold Biological Station fire, probably due to combustion of well-aerated litter. Maximum temperatures of petri dishes generally were lower than those of adjacent thermocouples, due to a greater lag time in melting of temperature-sensitive paints on petri dishes.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nafecology/sessions/fuel/4