Event Title

Longterm Effects of Prescribed Fire on Woody Plant Communities in Red Pine Ecosystems

Event Website

http://www.nafew2009.org/

Start Date

25-6-2009 8:00 AM

End Date

25-6-2009 8:20 AM

Description

In the early 1960’s a prescribed burning experiment was initiated on stands of 90-year-old Red Pine in the Cutfoot Experimental Forest. This is one of the oldest, regularly monitored prescribed fire studies in the Lake States. The burns were performed at (1) annual, (2) biennial, and (3) periodic intervals in both summer and dormant seasons. The objectives for the study were to determine the effects of different seasons and periodicities of prescribed burning on the (1) destruction and subsequent regrowth of hazel and other shrub species and (2) the establishment and growth of trees species under red pine. Measurements of the woody plant community have been made periodically through summer of 2005. Results show that annual growing season burns have long-lasting impacts on woody shrub communities, with hazel stem densities substantially lower in this treatment, compared to the others, even 40 years after the last fire. In fact, spring burning increased hazel densities. Moreover, several annual growing season burns appear to be conducive to establishment of an eastern white pine component under the red pine, if a seed source is present after the last fire. The other burn treatments were much less effective at promoting white pine establishment. The study results point out the need for repeated fires during the growing season to control hazel. Moreover, the results demonstrate the long-lasting impact of such fires on woody plant communities in red pine forests.

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Jun 25th, 8:00 AM Jun 25th, 8:20 AM

Longterm Effects of Prescribed Fire on Woody Plant Communities in Red Pine Ecosystems

In the early 1960’s a prescribed burning experiment was initiated on stands of 90-year-old Red Pine in the Cutfoot Experimental Forest. This is one of the oldest, regularly monitored prescribed fire studies in the Lake States. The burns were performed at (1) annual, (2) biennial, and (3) periodic intervals in both summer and dormant seasons. The objectives for the study were to determine the effects of different seasons and periodicities of prescribed burning on the (1) destruction and subsequent regrowth of hazel and other shrub species and (2) the establishment and growth of trees species under red pine. Measurements of the woody plant community have been made periodically through summer of 2005. Results show that annual growing season burns have long-lasting impacts on woody shrub communities, with hazel stem densities substantially lower in this treatment, compared to the others, even 40 years after the last fire. In fact, spring burning increased hazel densities. Moreover, several annual growing season burns appear to be conducive to establishment of an eastern white pine component under the red pine, if a seed source is present after the last fire. The other burn treatments were much less effective at promoting white pine establishment. The study results point out the need for repeated fires during the growing season to control hazel. Moreover, the results demonstrate the long-lasting impact of such fires on woody plant communities in red pine forests.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nafecology/sessions/longterm/9