Event Title

Preparing the Landscape for Invasion: Accelerating the Evolution of Resistance

Event Website

http://www.nafew2009.org/

Start Date

22-6-2009 12:00 AM

End Date

26-6-2009 12:00 AM

Description

Restoration of forests devastated by nonnative invaders often dominates the attention of forest mangers and their actions. However, taking a broader view of the invasion beyond the crisis areas reveals opportunities where proactive management can alter the outcome of the invasion in threatened areas. Proactive management moves past the idea of protecting the hosts from exposure to the established non-native invader and shifts toward facilitating naturalization by preparing the landscape to sustain critical ecosystem function into the future in the presence of the invader. Increasing the frequencies of durable resistance or tolerance traits within tree populations is accepted as a promising avenue for the co-existence of native tree species and non-native pathogens. Therefore the objective of proactive intervention is use silviculture to position the ecosystem to facilitate the evolution of pathogen-resistance in the tree populations upon invasion (Schoettle and Sniezko 2007*). Diversifying the age class structure by stimulating regeneration in the healthy forest will provide a larger population size for resistance selection upon invasion and simultaneous selection in both the younger and older cohorts. Accelerating the generation time and natural selection process through silvicultural treatments will reduce the ecological consequences of mortality in any one cohort and increases the potential for development of durable resistance within the population while maintaining broad genetic diversity. Introduction of stock with heritable resistance into stands that are not yet invaded by the nonnative pathogen would also increase the frequency of resistance on the landscape and accelerate the evolution of resistance. In addition, proactive artificial regeneration will reduce the window of time, after invasion, when the stands regeneration capability is comprise by mortality of the mature trees (Schoettle and Sniezko 2007*). This poster will discuss proactive silvicultural options for managing (1) high elevation 5-needle pines threatened by Cronartium ribicola (white pine blister rust) and (2) Port-Orford-cedar stands at risk for impacts from Phytophthora lateralis. [*Schoettle, AW and RA Sniezko (2007) Proactive intervention to sustain high elevation pine ecosystems threatened by white pine blister rust. Journal of Forest Research 12(5): 327-336. Available at: http://springerlink.metapress.com/content/9v91t44278w74430 /fulltext.pdf]

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Jun 22nd, 12:00 AM Jun 26th, 12:00 AM

Preparing the Landscape for Invasion: Accelerating the Evolution of Resistance

Restoration of forests devastated by nonnative invaders often dominates the attention of forest mangers and their actions. However, taking a broader view of the invasion beyond the crisis areas reveals opportunities where proactive management can alter the outcome of the invasion in threatened areas. Proactive management moves past the idea of protecting the hosts from exposure to the established non-native invader and shifts toward facilitating naturalization by preparing the landscape to sustain critical ecosystem function into the future in the presence of the invader. Increasing the frequencies of durable resistance or tolerance traits within tree populations is accepted as a promising avenue for the co-existence of native tree species and non-native pathogens. Therefore the objective of proactive intervention is use silviculture to position the ecosystem to facilitate the evolution of pathogen-resistance in the tree populations upon invasion (Schoettle and Sniezko 2007*). Diversifying the age class structure by stimulating regeneration in the healthy forest will provide a larger population size for resistance selection upon invasion and simultaneous selection in both the younger and older cohorts. Accelerating the generation time and natural selection process through silvicultural treatments will reduce the ecological consequences of mortality in any one cohort and increases the potential for development of durable resistance within the population while maintaining broad genetic diversity. Introduction of stock with heritable resistance into stands that are not yet invaded by the nonnative pathogen would also increase the frequency of resistance on the landscape and accelerate the evolution of resistance. In addition, proactive artificial regeneration will reduce the window of time, after invasion, when the stands regeneration capability is comprise by mortality of the mature trees (Schoettle and Sniezko 2007*). This poster will discuss proactive silvicultural options for managing (1) high elevation 5-needle pines threatened by Cronartium ribicola (white pine blister rust) and (2) Port-Orford-cedar stands at risk for impacts from Phytophthora lateralis. [*Schoettle, AW and RA Sniezko (2007) Proactive intervention to sustain high elevation pine ecosystems threatened by white pine blister rust. Journal of Forest Research 12(5): 327-336. Available at: http://springerlink.metapress.com/content/9v91t44278w74430 /fulltext.pdf]

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nafecology/sessions/posters/1