Event Title

Effects of Landform and Other Environmental Variables on Forest Site Quality in the Appalachian Mountains

Event Website

http://www.nafew2009.org/

Start Date

23-6-2009 10:50 AM

End Date

23-6-2009 11:10 AM

Description

Subregions are ecosystems of mesoscale size occurring between macroscale ecoregions of national extent and landscape units of subregional area within the U.S. Forest Service hierarchical classification framework of ecological units. The objective of this multi-disciplinary project was to develop a consistent national map of subregions from regional map products that had been developed independently by regional teams working with academic and conservation groups knowledgeable of ecosystems at local and state scales. Regional maps were joined and ecosystems were reviewed for consistency by a small national team consisting of representatives from each regional group. The national map received additional independent review for revision and refinement of ecosystems. The rationale and methodology for delineation of ecosystems shown on the map 'Ecological Subregions: Sections and Subsections of the Conterminous United States' is described in this report. Components of climate, geology, landform, soils and vegetation were integrated to form 190 sections and 1,234 subsection map units. This map represents the first approximation of ecological units at the subregions scale in the western U.S. and is a refinement of a 1995 map of Eastern subregions. Following its publication in 2007, the subregions map provides a basis for ecological mapping on Forest Service lands at the next lower finer scale: landtype associations. Case studies demonstrate use of the subregion map for ecosystem analysis in the Great Lakes Area and Appalachian Mountains in the southern United States. The 2007 map of subregions, supporting documents on methodology and databases of selected environmental data are available on CD. *Note: This abstract supplements and updates a preliminary report on the same topic that was presented, but not published, at the 2007 NAFEW, in Vancouver.

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Jun 23rd, 10:50 AM Jun 23rd, 11:10 AM

Effects of Landform and Other Environmental Variables on Forest Site Quality in the Appalachian Mountains

Subregions are ecosystems of mesoscale size occurring between macroscale ecoregions of national extent and landscape units of subregional area within the U.S. Forest Service hierarchical classification framework of ecological units. The objective of this multi-disciplinary project was to develop a consistent national map of subregions from regional map products that had been developed independently by regional teams working with academic and conservation groups knowledgeable of ecosystems at local and state scales. Regional maps were joined and ecosystems were reviewed for consistency by a small national team consisting of representatives from each regional group. The national map received additional independent review for revision and refinement of ecosystems. The rationale and methodology for delineation of ecosystems shown on the map 'Ecological Subregions: Sections and Subsections of the Conterminous United States' is described in this report. Components of climate, geology, landform, soils and vegetation were integrated to form 190 sections and 1,234 subsection map units. This map represents the first approximation of ecological units at the subregions scale in the western U.S. and is a refinement of a 1995 map of Eastern subregions. Following its publication in 2007, the subregions map provides a basis for ecological mapping on Forest Service lands at the next lower finer scale: landtype associations. Case studies demonstrate use of the subregion map for ecosystem analysis in the Great Lakes Area and Appalachian Mountains in the southern United States. The 2007 map of subregions, supporting documents on methodology and databases of selected environmental data are available on CD. *Note: This abstract supplements and updates a preliminary report on the same topic that was presented, but not published, at the 2007 NAFEW, in Vancouver.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nafecology/sessions/processes/2