Event Website

http://www.nafew2009.org/

Start Date

23-6-2009 9:00 AM

End Date

23-6-2009 9:20 AM

Description

The long-term effects of high-production harvesting and subsequent site-preparation practices are typically evaluated from a limiting resource perspective. Machines used in the harvesting compact the soil reducing aeration and uptake of water and nutrients. Moving the entire tree from the site removes organic matter and parts of the forest floor. Models translate these effects into direct consequences on tree growth and ultimately productivity. Trees response often conflicts with model predictions in many cases. Hierarchy theory does not require organisms to behave deterministically to account for behavior, but it does require a different approach. Our proposed talk will present an application of hierarchy to account for tree responses to soil and environmental changes due to high-production harvesting in some southern commercial plantations. We will present some hypotheses concerning the responses of height and diameter growth based on hierarchy theory and present data to evaluate applicability of this theory to tree growth in response to harvesting and perhaps other types of perturbations.

 
Jun 23rd, 9:00 AM Jun 23rd, 9:20 AM

Effects of Regeneration Practices on the Growth in Loblolly Pine Plantations From the Perspective of Hierarchy Theory

The long-term effects of high-production harvesting and subsequent site-preparation practices are typically evaluated from a limiting resource perspective. Machines used in the harvesting compact the soil reducing aeration and uptake of water and nutrients. Moving the entire tree from the site removes organic matter and parts of the forest floor. Models translate these effects into direct consequences on tree growth and ultimately productivity. Trees response often conflicts with model predictions in many cases. Hierarchy theory does not require organisms to behave deterministically to account for behavior, but it does require a different approach. Our proposed talk will present an application of hierarchy to account for tree responses to soil and environmental changes due to high-production harvesting in some southern commercial plantations. We will present some hypotheses concerning the responses of height and diameter growth based on hierarchy theory and present data to evaluate applicability of this theory to tree growth in response to harvesting and perhaps other types of perturbations.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nafecology/sessions/processes/6