Event Title

Structure and Composition of Post-Fire Regeneration on Upland Sites in Alberta

Event Website

http://www.nafew2009.org/

Start Date

23-6-2009 4:20 PM

End Date

23-6-2009 4:40 PM

Description

Although a good deal of post-fire vegetation development research has been done, there is a lack of information showing how western boreal mixedwoods regenerate after fire. The objective of our study was to conduct a broad survey using standard regeneration assessment protocols and evaluate regeneration attributes for fires 10 to 20 years after the fire disturbance. The heterogeneity in stand structure within the different fires was also of interest as well as the how late successional species Picea glauca is regenerating. Five fires in central and northern Alberta within the Lower Foothills and the Central Mixedwoods ecological subregions were selected. To compare the impact of different pre-fire composition on post-fire regeneration, we stratified the stands within the fires into broad classes (pure conifer, conifer dominated, deciduous dominated and pure deciduous stands) based on pre-fire regional forest inventory maps. Only post-fire stands with no anthropogenic disturbance were chosen. Within each stand we applied a systematic sampling design involving a 30 m inter-plot distance. For each 10 m2 circular plot we recorded tree species, measured stump height diameter and the height of the tallest conifer and deciduous tree. Additionally, at every fourth plot ten individuals of each species were measured for height and diameter. A total of 506 plots were sampled in 22 stands. A variety of nonparametric comparisons have been performed. Preliminary results suggest that there is no significant difference between the two ecological subregions. The number of plots with at least one conifer seedling in conifer and in conifer dominated stands increased with the time since fire. The most common species found were Populus tremuloides and Populus balsamifera while the most common conifers were Pinus contorta and Pinus banksiana. Our preliminary results suggest that pre-fire stands dominated by Picea glauca regenerate as deciduous stands post fire.

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Jun 23rd, 4:20 PM Jun 23rd, 4:40 PM

Structure and Composition of Post-Fire Regeneration on Upland Sites in Alberta

Although a good deal of post-fire vegetation development research has been done, there is a lack of information showing how western boreal mixedwoods regenerate after fire. The objective of our study was to conduct a broad survey using standard regeneration assessment protocols and evaluate regeneration attributes for fires 10 to 20 years after the fire disturbance. The heterogeneity in stand structure within the different fires was also of interest as well as the how late successional species Picea glauca is regenerating. Five fires in central and northern Alberta within the Lower Foothills and the Central Mixedwoods ecological subregions were selected. To compare the impact of different pre-fire composition on post-fire regeneration, we stratified the stands within the fires into broad classes (pure conifer, conifer dominated, deciduous dominated and pure deciduous stands) based on pre-fire regional forest inventory maps. Only post-fire stands with no anthropogenic disturbance were chosen. Within each stand we applied a systematic sampling design involving a 30 m inter-plot distance. For each 10 m2 circular plot we recorded tree species, measured stump height diameter and the height of the tallest conifer and deciduous tree. Additionally, at every fourth plot ten individuals of each species were measured for height and diameter. A total of 506 plots were sampled in 22 stands. A variety of nonparametric comparisons have been performed. Preliminary results suggest that there is no significant difference between the two ecological subregions. The number of plots with at least one conifer seedling in conifer and in conifer dominated stands increased with the time since fire. The most common species found were Populus tremuloides and Populus balsamifera while the most common conifers were Pinus contorta and Pinus banksiana. Our preliminary results suggest that pre-fire stands dominated by Picea glauca regenerate as deciduous stands post fire.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nafecology/sessions/recovery/8