Event Title

Whitebark Pine Assessment and Restoration in Central Rockies National Parks

Event Website

http://www.nafew2009.org/

Start Date

22-6-2009 2:50 PM

End Date

22-6-2009 3:10 PM

Description

White pine blister rust and mountain pine beetle are having profound effects on the whitebark pine in the National Parks of the Central Rockies. The importance of this species for ecosystem services including water retention at high elevations, slope stabilization, and providing a highly nutritional food source for grizzly bears and other wildlife species, has been recognized by National Park Service managers for several decades. Analysis of monitoring activities conducted from the 1990ís, and renewed efforts in 2003-2008 show that blister rust and blister rust-related mortality is increasing in stands throughout the parks and forests of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, as well as in Montana and Washington parks. The park service is participating in projects to map mortality, determine if successful regeneration is occurring in these stands, and develop restoration strategies. Parks are preserving whitebark pine genetics through operational cone collections, and participating in the US Forest Service-lead whitebark pine genetic improvement and restoration program to identify genetically rust resistant trees. Parks are laying the foundation to begin restoration activities in whitebark pine stands where mortality is high and regeneration success is low.

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Jun 22nd, 2:50 PM Jun 22nd, 3:10 PM

Whitebark Pine Assessment and Restoration in Central Rockies National Parks

White pine blister rust and mountain pine beetle are having profound effects on the whitebark pine in the National Parks of the Central Rockies. The importance of this species for ecosystem services including water retention at high elevations, slope stabilization, and providing a highly nutritional food source for grizzly bears and other wildlife species, has been recognized by National Park Service managers for several decades. Analysis of monitoring activities conducted from the 1990ís, and renewed efforts in 2003-2008 show that blister rust and blister rust-related mortality is increasing in stands throughout the parks and forests of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, as well as in Montana and Washington parks. The park service is participating in projects to map mortality, determine if successful regeneration is occurring in these stands, and develop restoration strategies. Parks are preserving whitebark pine genetics through operational cone collections, and participating in the US Forest Service-lead whitebark pine genetic improvement and restoration program to identify genetically rust resistant trees. Parks are laying the foundation to begin restoration activities in whitebark pine stands where mortality is high and regeneration success is low.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nafecology/sessions/whitebark/2