Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Characterization of the Effects of High-dose Radiation on Skeletal Muscle

Presenter Information

Lori CaldwellFollow

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2018

College

College of Engineering

Department

Biological Engineering Department

Faculty Mentor

Elizabeth Vargis

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Introduction:

As longer space missions become more desirable to public and private institutions, the physiological impact on astronauts must be considered. One of the primary concerns for those spending time in low-gravity environments is muscle atrophy, the eventual loss of muscle tissue. A major factor in muscular atrophy is oxidative stress which is amplified by increased levels of ionizing radiation during spaceflight. Additionally, high levels of radiation can damage DNA, increasing the risk of cancer.

Dr. Dennison’s Space Environment Test Facility was used to irradiate C2C12 myoblasts, cultured in standard culture flasks, with a dosage similar to conditions on the International Space Station. Cell changes due to increased levels of radiation were characterized with fluorescent imaging for H2AX, a marker of double stranded DNA damage, and Trypan blue viability staining.

Materials and Methods:

C2C12 myoblast cells were cultured in standard tissue culture flasks. Cells were maintained using High Glucose DMEM nutrient medium with 10% FBS for two days then High Glucose DMEM with 2% FBS to differentiate the cells. Differentiated cells were placed in Dr. Dennison’s Space Environment Effects Test Facility and exposed to radiation levels between 0.05 Gy and 5 Gy to model the radiation dosage seen on the International Space Station, approximately 0.05 milli Gy per year. Immediately after exposure, cells were analyzed for viability and damage. A concurrent set of cells were incubated for seven days following radiation exposure prior to viability testing.

Conclusions:

It is expected that cell viability will decrease with increasing radiation dosage until a viability threshold is reached, at approximately 2 Gy, where cell viability should be zero. Preliminary results indicate that exposed cells initially have a moderate viability, but after continued culture the viability rises.

Location

North Atrium

Start Date

13-4-2017 12:00 PM

End Date

13-4-2017 1:15 PM

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Apr 13th, 12:00 PM Apr 13th, 1:15 PM

Characterization of the Effects of High-dose Radiation on Skeletal Muscle

North Atrium

Introduction:

As longer space missions become more desirable to public and private institutions, the physiological impact on astronauts must be considered. One of the primary concerns for those spending time in low-gravity environments is muscle atrophy, the eventual loss of muscle tissue. A major factor in muscular atrophy is oxidative stress which is amplified by increased levels of ionizing radiation during spaceflight. Additionally, high levels of radiation can damage DNA, increasing the risk of cancer.

Dr. Dennison’s Space Environment Test Facility was used to irradiate C2C12 myoblasts, cultured in standard culture flasks, with a dosage similar to conditions on the International Space Station. Cell changes due to increased levels of radiation were characterized with fluorescent imaging for H2AX, a marker of double stranded DNA damage, and Trypan blue viability staining.

Materials and Methods:

C2C12 myoblast cells were cultured in standard tissue culture flasks. Cells were maintained using High Glucose DMEM nutrient medium with 10% FBS for two days then High Glucose DMEM with 2% FBS to differentiate the cells. Differentiated cells were placed in Dr. Dennison’s Space Environment Effects Test Facility and exposed to radiation levels between 0.05 Gy and 5 Gy to model the radiation dosage seen on the International Space Station, approximately 0.05 milli Gy per year. Immediately after exposure, cells were analyzed for viability and damage. A concurrent set of cells were incubated for seven days following radiation exposure prior to viability testing.

Conclusions:

It is expected that cell viability will decrease with increasing radiation dosage until a viability threshold is reached, at approximately 2 Gy, where cell viability should be zero. Preliminary results indicate that exposed cells initially have a moderate viability, but after continued culture the viability rises.