Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Novel use for Cement Production Byproduct as Chemical Coagulant and Flocculant

Presenter Information

Alan HodgesFollow

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2017

College

College of Engineering

Department

Biological Engineering Department

Faculty Mentor

Ronald Sims

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

New nationwide phosphorus standards for effluent wastewater has renewed the emphasis on using chemical coagulants/flocculants for the removal of suspended solids and phosphorus from municipal and industrial wastewater. This study explores a novel chemical coagulant derived from the cement industry, expanded shale. Jar tests were used to test the turbidity, total suspended solids (TSS), and phosphorus removal of the coagulation/flocculation process using the novel coagulant, expanded shale, and an industry standard coagulant, ferric sulfate, for comparison. Sludge obtained from a municipal wastewater treatment plant was diluted to produce a simulated wastewater for jar testing. Simulated wastewater media was turbid (390 NTU) and contained 250 mg/L suspended solids. A range of concentrations of coagulant ((0-250 mg/L ferric sulfate and 0-10 g/L expanded shale) was used to find the optimum turbidity/ TSS reduction for each coagulant. Both coagulants removed a similar amount of suspended solids and phosphorus from the wastewater; however, a much greater concentration of expanded shale was needed to remove similar levels of TSS (2 g/l expanded shale vs 0.25 g/L ferric sulfate). Additionally, expanded shale treatment resulted in increased turbidity and pH of the wastewater. Overall, the ferric sulfate treatment outperformed the expanded shale treatment, however the low cost of the expanded shale and the demonstrated TSS removal may make expanded shale appropriate for some industries.

Location

North Atrium

Start Date

13-4-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

13-4-2017 2:45 PM

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Apr 13th, 1:30 PM Apr 13th, 2:45 PM

Novel use for Cement Production Byproduct as Chemical Coagulant and Flocculant

North Atrium

New nationwide phosphorus standards for effluent wastewater has renewed the emphasis on using chemical coagulants/flocculants for the removal of suspended solids and phosphorus from municipal and industrial wastewater. This study explores a novel chemical coagulant derived from the cement industry, expanded shale. Jar tests were used to test the turbidity, total suspended solids (TSS), and phosphorus removal of the coagulation/flocculation process using the novel coagulant, expanded shale, and an industry standard coagulant, ferric sulfate, for comparison. Sludge obtained from a municipal wastewater treatment plant was diluted to produce a simulated wastewater for jar testing. Simulated wastewater media was turbid (390 NTU) and contained 250 mg/L suspended solids. A range of concentrations of coagulant ((0-250 mg/L ferric sulfate and 0-10 g/L expanded shale) was used to find the optimum turbidity/ TSS reduction for each coagulant. Both coagulants removed a similar amount of suspended solids and phosphorus from the wastewater; however, a much greater concentration of expanded shale was needed to remove similar levels of TSS (2 g/l expanded shale vs 0.25 g/L ferric sulfate). Additionally, expanded shale treatment resulted in increased turbidity and pH of the wastewater. Overall, the ferric sulfate treatment outperformed the expanded shale treatment, however the low cost of the expanded shale and the demonstrated TSS removal may make expanded shale appropriate for some industries.