Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Characterization and isolation of biofilm components from rhizosphere microbes

Presenter Information

Michelle BonebrakeFollow

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2018

College

College of Engineering

Department

Biological Engineering Department

Faculty Mentor

David Britt

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

The rhizosphere of a plant contains many microorganisms that can help or hinder plant health and production. Understanding the impact of microbial activity, especially beneficial microbes, in the rhizosphere is important for agricultural production. Due to the complexities of the rhizosphere the components of a bacterial biofilm can be difficult to study. A root mimetic system has been constructed as a method of growing bacterial biofilms in a laboratory environment. The system features a hollow fiber membrane which delivers nutrients through the lumen to bacteria growing on the outside of the fiber. This small bioreactor mimics bacteria growth on plant roots that gain nutrients through root exudation and allows for the assessment of the role of rhizosphere metabolites on bacteria colonization and biofilm formation. The root mimetic system allows for isolation of a bacteria biofilm under a controlled nutrient flow. This system allows for the control of factors without the complex interactions that can occur in the rhizosphere. The differences in bacterial biofilms compositions under varying nutrients and stress conditions are studied and characterized for their differences in resulting compounds. Bacteria exhibit different reactions when in the presence of different nutrient compounds, as well as stressors such as zinc or copper nanoparticles. The system allows for a unique method to study the interplay of nanoparticles and rhizosphere metabolites. The root mimetic system allows for a better understanding of the role bacteria plays in plant health and the interactions that can occur between plant and bacteria.

Location

North Atrium

Start Date

13-4-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

13-4-2017 2:45 PM

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Apr 13th, 1:30 PM Apr 13th, 2:45 PM

Characterization and isolation of biofilm components from rhizosphere microbes

North Atrium

The rhizosphere of a plant contains many microorganisms that can help or hinder plant health and production. Understanding the impact of microbial activity, especially beneficial microbes, in the rhizosphere is important for agricultural production. Due to the complexities of the rhizosphere the components of a bacterial biofilm can be difficult to study. A root mimetic system has been constructed as a method of growing bacterial biofilms in a laboratory environment. The system features a hollow fiber membrane which delivers nutrients through the lumen to bacteria growing on the outside of the fiber. This small bioreactor mimics bacteria growth on plant roots that gain nutrients through root exudation and allows for the assessment of the role of rhizosphere metabolites on bacteria colonization and biofilm formation. The root mimetic system allows for isolation of a bacteria biofilm under a controlled nutrient flow. This system allows for the control of factors without the complex interactions that can occur in the rhizosphere. The differences in bacterial biofilms compositions under varying nutrients and stress conditions are studied and characterized for their differences in resulting compounds. Bacteria exhibit different reactions when in the presence of different nutrient compounds, as well as stressors such as zinc or copper nanoparticles. The system allows for a unique method to study the interplay of nanoparticles and rhizosphere metabolites. The root mimetic system allows for a better understanding of the role bacteria plays in plant health and the interactions that can occur between plant and bacteria.