Location

USU Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://www.restoringthewest.org/

Streaming Media

Abstract

The ‘easy’ oil & gas is gone and energy companies must seek their resources in harder to get to locations. This can cause conflicts with various other resources including wildlife. Energy companies want to be good neighbors and are motivated to peacefully coexist. Progressive companies are interested in working with real conservation groups and wildlife agencies to help conserve and propagate species of concern in operations areas. Intensive pre-project & operational planning is required more than ever. Companies should meet with the appropriate conservation stakeholders and agencies to identify resources and species of concern and the known threats to the same. Comprehensive science is typically lacking and thus adaptive management for wildlife issues is critical. This requires commitment and flexibility from both the energy companies and the wildlife agencies. Companies need to utilize, “low-impact” methods where appropriate and practicable - e.g. 3-D seismic, directional drilling (multi-well pads), low visibility equipment, remote telemetry, etc. Energy companies can bring financial and equipment resources to the table that may otherwise be unavailable or limited for helping with conservation efforts. We are ‘results-oriented’ companies made up of scientists, engineers and businessmen. Operators prefer to work with legitimate conservation groups and wildlife agencies for on-the- ground projects that increase, enhance, or conserve wildlife habitat. We also understand the need for both up front and after the fact science whether surveys, or monitoring, or audits of projects, it’s all important. Litigation doesn’t help enhance or create habitat or forage for wildlife. The West Tavaputs EIS-Record of Decision Wildlife Mitigation Plan and the Colorado Molina Habitat Restoration Project are two great examples of energy companies working with agencies and wildlife/sportsmen groups to get things done on the ground to improve habitat and forage as well as to educate the public.

Scot A. Donato, Manager, Governmental Affairs, Bill Barrett Corporation, 1099 18th Street, Suite 2300, Denver, CO 80202, sdonato@billbarretcorp.com

Scot Donato is the Manager of Governmental Affairs for Bill Barrett Corporation, a Colorado-based oil and natural gas producer with operations in the Rocky Mountains. Mr. Donato is responsible for environmental and governmental affairs matters in this multi-state area. Scot is responsible for developing mitigation plans in association with BBC’s energy development. He has worked with multiple state and federal agencies and sportsmen/conservation groups to accomplish the goal of conserving wildlife while responsibly developing energy resources. Scot has a Bachelors degree in Geology from Western State College in Gunnison, Colorado and a Masters of Environmental Policy & Management from the University of Denver, and his professional experience includes over 30 years in the environmental, regulatory, and oil & gas industry working on a wide variety of challenges.

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Oct 30th, 10:30 AM Oct 30th, 11:00 AM

Energy and Wildlife – Investments in Conservation

USU Eccles Conference Center

The ‘easy’ oil & gas is gone and energy companies must seek their resources in harder to get to locations. This can cause conflicts with various other resources including wildlife. Energy companies want to be good neighbors and are motivated to peacefully coexist. Progressive companies are interested in working with real conservation groups and wildlife agencies to help conserve and propagate species of concern in operations areas. Intensive pre-project & operational planning is required more than ever. Companies should meet with the appropriate conservation stakeholders and agencies to identify resources and species of concern and the known threats to the same. Comprehensive science is typically lacking and thus adaptive management for wildlife issues is critical. This requires commitment and flexibility from both the energy companies and the wildlife agencies. Companies need to utilize, “low-impact” methods where appropriate and practicable - e.g. 3-D seismic, directional drilling (multi-well pads), low visibility equipment, remote telemetry, etc. Energy companies can bring financial and equipment resources to the table that may otherwise be unavailable or limited for helping with conservation efforts. We are ‘results-oriented’ companies made up of scientists, engineers and businessmen. Operators prefer to work with legitimate conservation groups and wildlife agencies for on-the- ground projects that increase, enhance, or conserve wildlife habitat. We also understand the need for both up front and after the fact science whether surveys, or monitoring, or audits of projects, it’s all important. Litigation doesn’t help enhance or create habitat or forage for wildlife. The West Tavaputs EIS-Record of Decision Wildlife Mitigation Plan and the Colorado Molina Habitat Restoration Project are two great examples of energy companies working with agencies and wildlife/sportsmen groups to get things done on the ground to improve habitat and forage as well as to educate the public.

Scot A. Donato, Manager, Governmental Affairs, Bill Barrett Corporation, 1099 18th Street, Suite 2300, Denver, CO 80202, sdonato@billbarretcorp.com

Scot Donato is the Manager of Governmental Affairs for Bill Barrett Corporation, a Colorado-based oil and natural gas producer with operations in the Rocky Mountains. Mr. Donato is responsible for environmental and governmental affairs matters in this multi-state area. Scot is responsible for developing mitigation plans in association with BBC’s energy development. He has worked with multiple state and federal agencies and sportsmen/conservation groups to accomplish the goal of conserving wildlife while responsibly developing energy resources. Scot has a Bachelors degree in Geology from Western State College in Gunnison, Colorado and a Masters of Environmental Policy & Management from the University of Denver, and his professional experience includes over 30 years in the environmental, regulatory, and oil & gas industry working on a wide variety of challenges.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/rtw/2012/october30/4