Location

USU Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://www.restoringthewest.org/

Streaming Media

Abstract

Wildlife-oriented mitigation is a sequential process guided (loosely) by a set of general principles and rules. When well carried out, it can be instrumental to achieving broadly desirable outcomes from natural resource development negotiations. Planning mitigation in the right way depends upon having balanced perspectives from the outset. One also needs to have at least some of the right technical information, a functional understanding of applicable regulations, and an awareness of what the other parties to the negotiation need or want. No step-by-step “cookbook” solutions exist for wildlife mitigation: each unique case presents inherent complexities, and situations affected by large numbers of variables tend to vary widely from one instance to the next. There are no simple formulas, but generalized processes can be adapted by skilled, creative professionals, permitting some level of mitigation repeatability. Collaborative approaches employed by the state wildlife agency in Utah will be explained, and exemplified. Discussion of current issues and future options may follow, if time allows.

Bill James, Energy Development / NEPA Coordinator, Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, 1594 West North Temple, Suite 2110, PO Box 146301, Salt Lake City, UT 84114-6301, billjames@utah.gov

Bill began his formal training 30 years ago at Oklahoma State University, where he earned a BS in wildlife ecology. He also holds an MS in forest resources from the University of Georgia, where he and several other researchers reestablished bobcat populations on Cumberland Island, Georgia. He first worked for the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources in 1987, left for a time, then came back in 1991. He has worked in various capacities for Utah DWR ever since. Bill’s professional interests revolve around working with different kinds of people to address tough natural resource issues. He lives in Salt Lake City with his wife, and their daughter is now a sophomore at Utah State University in Logan.

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Oct 31st, 11:00 AM Oct 31st, 11:30 AM

Utah Division of Wildlife Resources’ Approach to Impact Analysis and Mitigation

USU Eccles Conference Center

Wildlife-oriented mitigation is a sequential process guided (loosely) by a set of general principles and rules. When well carried out, it can be instrumental to achieving broadly desirable outcomes from natural resource development negotiations. Planning mitigation in the right way depends upon having balanced perspectives from the outset. One also needs to have at least some of the right technical information, a functional understanding of applicable regulations, and an awareness of what the other parties to the negotiation need or want. No step-by-step “cookbook” solutions exist for wildlife mitigation: each unique case presents inherent complexities, and situations affected by large numbers of variables tend to vary widely from one instance to the next. There are no simple formulas, but generalized processes can be adapted by skilled, creative professionals, permitting some level of mitigation repeatability. Collaborative approaches employed by the state wildlife agency in Utah will be explained, and exemplified. Discussion of current issues and future options may follow, if time allows.

Bill James, Energy Development / NEPA Coordinator, Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, 1594 West North Temple, Suite 2110, PO Box 146301, Salt Lake City, UT 84114-6301, billjames@utah.gov

Bill began his formal training 30 years ago at Oklahoma State University, where he earned a BS in wildlife ecology. He also holds an MS in forest resources from the University of Georgia, where he and several other researchers reestablished bobcat populations on Cumberland Island, Georgia. He first worked for the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources in 1987, left for a time, then came back in 1991. He has worked in various capacities for Utah DWR ever since. Bill’s professional interests revolve around working with different kinds of people to address tough natural resource issues. He lives in Salt Lake City with his wife, and their daughter is now a sophomore at Utah State University in Logan.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/rtw/2012/october31/4