Event Title

Accessing Information about Plants in the Region’s Herbaria

Location

USU Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://www.restoringthewest.org/

Abstract

Herbaria are working together to providing online access to the information in their collections. The process involves databasing label and annotation data from individual specimens, georeferencing the collection locations, and (often) imaging the specimens themselves. The Intermountain Region portal (http:// intermountainbiota.org) currently provides access to information from over 2.3 million specimens located in 30+ herbaria. The data can be freely downloaded for use in other programs. The portal can also be used to obtain a species list for a region; view images of living examples of a species; make teaching/training checklists available to field technicians and students; and peruse species descriptions. Teaching checklists are automatically associated with flash card quizzes and games of “hangman.” Herbaria are committed to making their specimen information more accessible, the primary limitations being time and money. There is also concern about our ability to provide future generations with verifiable information about what is growing in the region now. If the names of plants are important enough to mention in a report, representative specimens should be deposited in one of the region’s herbaria, preferably one committed to contributing to the regional portal. Fortunately, the developments that make providing access to herbarium information possible also make it easier to record and transmit the information associated with specimens. For information on how, go to http:// herbarium.usu.edu/symbiota/default.html. Help us help you and future generations by depositing specimens from your studies in a participating herbarium and by drawing attention to the regional web site.

Mary Barkworth, Intermountain Herbarium, Department of Biology, Utah State University, 5305 Old Main Hill, Logan, Utah 84322-5305, mary.barkworth@usu.edu

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Oct 30th, 9:00 AM Oct 30th, 10:00 AM

Accessing Information about Plants in the Region’s Herbaria

USU Eccles Conference Center

Herbaria are working together to providing online access to the information in their collections. The process involves databasing label and annotation data from individual specimens, georeferencing the collection locations, and (often) imaging the specimens themselves. The Intermountain Region portal (http:// intermountainbiota.org) currently provides access to information from over 2.3 million specimens located in 30+ herbaria. The data can be freely downloaded for use in other programs. The portal can also be used to obtain a species list for a region; view images of living examples of a species; make teaching/training checklists available to field technicians and students; and peruse species descriptions. Teaching checklists are automatically associated with flash card quizzes and games of “hangman.” Herbaria are committed to making their specimen information more accessible, the primary limitations being time and money. There is also concern about our ability to provide future generations with verifiable information about what is growing in the region now. If the names of plants are important enough to mention in a report, representative specimens should be deposited in one of the region’s herbaria, preferably one committed to contributing to the regional portal. Fortunately, the developments that make providing access to herbarium information possible also make it easier to record and transmit the information associated with specimens. For information on how, go to http:// herbarium.usu.edu/symbiota/default.html. Help us help you and future generations by depositing specimens from your studies in a participating herbarium and by drawing attention to the regional web site.

Mary Barkworth, Intermountain Herbarium, Department of Biology, Utah State University, 5305 Old Main Hill, Logan, Utah 84322-5305, mary.barkworth@usu.edu

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/rtw/2012/posters/2