Event Title

Assessment and Monitoring Tools for Riparian Areas

Presenter Information

Mark Petersen

Location

USU Eccles Conference Center

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Abstract

In 1996, the Bureau of Land Management and US Forest Service, in partnership with the Natural Resources Conservation Service, created a national riparian strategy called “Accelerating Cooperative Riparian Restoration and Management.” An interagency, interdisciplinary team, the National Riparian Service Team (RNST), based in Prineville, Oregon, was established to implement the Strategy. To assist with implementation of the Strategy, a Riparian Coordination Network (RCN) has been established with Riparian Service Teams in each of the western states, Canada, and Mexico. The RNST and RCN has adopted as foundational tools, the Proper Functioning Condition (PFC) riparian assessment protocol, a methodology for assessing the functionality and health of riparian areas, and the Multiple Indicator Monitoring (MIM) protocol, a methodology for monitoring use and management impacts on stream channels and riparian vegetation. The PFC methodology provides a consistent approach for assessing the physical functioning of riparian areas through consideration of hydrology, vegetation, soil and landform attributes. MIM is a monitoring methodology that allows for statistical analysis of a comprehensive group of interrelated indicators, including three short-term and seven long-term indicators. This presentation gives a brief introduction to these two useful tools for assessing and monitoring riparian areas. Training opportunities provided by national and state Riparian Service Teams to help practitioners become proficient in the proper use of these tools are also mentioned.

Comments

Mark Petersen is Owner and Senior Scientist of Petersen Environmental Consulting. He earned degrees in Range Ecology and Watershed Science from Utah State University. He had a successful 32 year career with USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service as a Hydrologist, District Conservationist, Area and State Rangeland Specialist, and State Watershed Planning Specialist, which included being Program Lead for Riparian and

Water Quality Programs. For the last 15 years as Senior Scientist for Petersen Environmental Consulting, he has contracted with Utah Farm Bureau to assist farmers and ranchers with environmental issues such as water quality, sensitive species, and riparian issues. Mark is Co-Lead of the Utah Riparian Service Team and has been a member of the Team for over 20 years. He has taught numerous workshops on both the Riparian Proper Functioning Condition (PFC) and Riparian Multiple Indicator Monitoring (MIM) protocols. He has lead Interdisciplinary Teams to conduct riparian PFC assessments for hundreds of miles of stream and riparian areas, and has helped implement MIM on both public and private lands.

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Oct 21st, 1:30 PM Oct 21st, 2:00 PM

Assessment and Monitoring Tools for Riparian Areas

USU Eccles Conference Center

In 1996, the Bureau of Land Management and US Forest Service, in partnership with the Natural Resources Conservation Service, created a national riparian strategy called “Accelerating Cooperative Riparian Restoration and Management.” An interagency, interdisciplinary team, the National Riparian Service Team (RNST), based in Prineville, Oregon, was established to implement the Strategy. To assist with implementation of the Strategy, a Riparian Coordination Network (RCN) has been established with Riparian Service Teams in each of the western states, Canada, and Mexico. The RNST and RCN has adopted as foundational tools, the Proper Functioning Condition (PFC) riparian assessment protocol, a methodology for assessing the functionality and health of riparian areas, and the Multiple Indicator Monitoring (MIM) protocol, a methodology for monitoring use and management impacts on stream channels and riparian vegetation. The PFC methodology provides a consistent approach for assessing the physical functioning of riparian areas through consideration of hydrology, vegetation, soil and landform attributes. MIM is a monitoring methodology that allows for statistical analysis of a comprehensive group of interrelated indicators, including three short-term and seven long-term indicators. This presentation gives a brief introduction to these two useful tools for assessing and monitoring riparian areas. Training opportunities provided by national and state Riparian Service Teams to help practitioners become proficient in the proper use of these tools are also mentioned.