Event Title

Understanding the Landscape of Public Attitudes About Climate Change

Presenter Information

Peter D. Howe

Location

USU Eccles Conference Center

Streaming Media

Abstract

There is a demonstrated need among decision makers for locally relevant information about climate change. In response to this need, climate scientists have developed a variety of methods of to “downscale” climate model projections from global models to the regional and local scale. However, comparable local data representing the human dimensions of climate change, such as public perceptions and beliefs, has been less fully developed. is presentation describes a new tool for mapping variations in state and local climate and energy opinions within the U.S. Effectively responding to climate change will likely require the enactment of national, state, and local mitigation and adaptation policies as well as changes in individual behavior. is tool provides an important new source of locally relevant information for policymakers, educators, managers, and scientists to more effectively address these challenges.

Comments

Peter Howe is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environment & Society at Utah State University. Dr. Howe is a human-environment geographer specializing in the human dimensions of climate change and environmental hazards. His research focuses on the intersection of human perception and decision-making with societal vulnerability and adaptation to climate change and environmental hazards. Prior to joining Utah State, Dr. Howe was a postdoctoral researcher at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. He received his PhD in 2012 from the Department of Geography at Penn State University.

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Oct 18th, 11:10 AM Oct 18th, 11:40 AM

Understanding the Landscape of Public Attitudes About Climate Change

USU Eccles Conference Center

There is a demonstrated need among decision makers for locally relevant information about climate change. In response to this need, climate scientists have developed a variety of methods of to “downscale” climate model projections from global models to the regional and local scale. However, comparable local data representing the human dimensions of climate change, such as public perceptions and beliefs, has been less fully developed. is presentation describes a new tool for mapping variations in state and local climate and energy opinions within the U.S. Effectively responding to climate change will likely require the enactment of national, state, and local mitigation and adaptation policies as well as changes in individual behavior. is tool provides an important new source of locally relevant information for policymakers, educators, managers, and scientists to more effectively address these challenges.