Event Title

Navigating Complex Human-Nature Relationships in Rocky Mountain and Wasatch Communities

Presenter Information

Courtney G. Flint

Location

USU Eccles Conference Center

Streaming Media

Abstract

For people who live, work, and play in mountains and forests in the Intermountain West, ecosystems disturbances affect quality of life. Yet, navigating the diverse array of often-contradictory local and regional stakeholder perspectives can challenge natural resource management. Values and concerns about natural resource conditions and objectives can vary widely within and across communities and often change over time. Further, individuals, groups, and communities often seek multiple and conflicting resource objectives at the same time. Drawing on research from Colorado communities experiencing mountain pine beetle disturbance as well as Utah mountain communities anticipating population growth and climate change, findings and observations are offered in this presentation regarding navigating human dimensions of forest resource management.

Comments

Dr. Courtney G. Flint is a Natural Resource Sociologist at Utah State University. She has published widely on perceptions and actions of people and communities within changing social and environmental conditions. Her research projects in recent years have focused on community dimensions of forest disturbance in Alaska and Colorado, factors influencing agricultural nutrient management practices in Illinois, and social dimensions of water resource sustainability in Utah. Dr. Flint also serves on the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s Board of Scientific Counselors.

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Oct 19th, 9:15 AM Oct 19th, 9:55 AM

Navigating Complex Human-Nature Relationships in Rocky Mountain and Wasatch Communities

USU Eccles Conference Center

For people who live, work, and play in mountains and forests in the Intermountain West, ecosystems disturbances affect quality of life. Yet, navigating the diverse array of often-contradictory local and regional stakeholder perspectives can challenge natural resource management. Values and concerns about natural resource conditions and objectives can vary widely within and across communities and often change over time. Further, individuals, groups, and communities often seek multiple and conflicting resource objectives at the same time. Drawing on research from Colorado communities experiencing mountain pine beetle disturbance as well as Utah mountain communities anticipating population growth and climate change, findings and observations are offered in this presentation regarding navigating human dimensions of forest resource management.