Event Title

Wildlife Response to Climate Change in the Western US: Learning from Indicator Species

Presenter Information

Lise Aubry

Location

USU Eccles Conference Center

Streaming Media

Abstract

Measuring, Understanding and Predicting wildlife response to climate change is a pressing matter since there is widespread concern about impacts on population persistence and whether or not sensitive species will be able to adapt. Research is needed to inform conservation strategies for species that are most susceptible and indicative of rapid climate change, such as hibernators. We are taking advantage of historical data on Uinta ground squirrel populations (hibernators endemic to the Western US) to 1) Measure climate-driven variability in their phenology and demography over a 50-year period; 2) Understand how ecological processes mediate this variability in light of climate change; and 3) Predict their ability to adapt to climate change using eco-evolutionary models. Our findings will have important conservation implications for hibernating and alpine species in the Intermountain West, worldwide, and for the suite of species that depend on small mammals for persistence.

Comments

I am a population ecologist interested in quantifying the impacts of anthropogenic factors such as climate change and habitat fragmentation, on the ecology, demography, and microevolution of wild species, mainly vertebrates. How wild populations respond to management actions (e.g. harvest) and conservation practices is also a topic of great interest. My research calls for the analyses of longitudinal data and methodologies that stem from demography, population ecology, and life history theory. I received my MS from the Universite Paul Sabatier in Toulouse, France, and later complete my PhD at the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research in Rostock, Germany. After two postdocs at Utah State University funded by the Berryman institute and NSF, I am now an Assistant Professor in the Department of Wildland Resources. http://liseaubry.webs.com/

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Oct 19th, 10:50 AM Oct 19th, 11:20 AM

Wildlife Response to Climate Change in the Western US: Learning from Indicator Species

USU Eccles Conference Center

Measuring, Understanding and Predicting wildlife response to climate change is a pressing matter since there is widespread concern about impacts on population persistence and whether or not sensitive species will be able to adapt. Research is needed to inform conservation strategies for species that are most susceptible and indicative of rapid climate change, such as hibernators. We are taking advantage of historical data on Uinta ground squirrel populations (hibernators endemic to the Western US) to 1) Measure climate-driven variability in their phenology and demography over a 50-year period; 2) Understand how ecological processes mediate this variability in light of climate change; and 3) Predict their ability to adapt to climate change using eco-evolutionary models. Our findings will have important conservation implications for hibernating and alpine species in the Intermountain West, worldwide, and for the suite of species that depend on small mammals for persistence.