Event Title

Fire in the West: Risk Perceptions, Attitudes and Other Cognitions of Wildland and Prescribed Burning

Presenter Information

Lauren Nicole Dupey

Location

USU Eccles Conference Center

Abstract

To date, human dimensions of wildland fire research has used a diversity of theoretical frameworks to address various research topics on the cognitions surrounding wildland and prescribed fire. This literature has yet to be synthesized through a systematic review. In this research, we compiled all previous empirical research conducted within the western United States that addressed cognitions surrounding wildland and prescribed fire. We assessed four thematic categories through questions and corresponding codes to systematically analyze the literature and provide suggestions for future research. The four thematic categories included: theory and methods used, psychosocial aspects of fire, biophysical aspects of fire, and fire type and management. We identify gaps in the literature within each of these four areas. By doing so, we were able to identify areas where future for research in the western US is needed most.

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Oct 18th, 5:05 PM Oct 18th, 5:10 PM

Fire in the West: Risk Perceptions, Attitudes and Other Cognitions of Wildland and Prescribed Burning

USU Eccles Conference Center

To date, human dimensions of wildland fire research has used a diversity of theoretical frameworks to address various research topics on the cognitions surrounding wildland and prescribed fire. This literature has yet to be synthesized through a systematic review. In this research, we compiled all previous empirical research conducted within the western United States that addressed cognitions surrounding wildland and prescribed fire. We assessed four thematic categories through questions and corresponding codes to systematically analyze the literature and provide suggestions for future research. The four thematic categories included: theory and methods used, psychosocial aspects of fire, biophysical aspects of fire, and fire type and management. We identify gaps in the literature within each of these four areas. By doing so, we were able to identify areas where future for research in the western US is needed most.