Event Title

Estimating Streamflow Statistics for Ungaged Streams in Utah – Development of Regional Flow-Characteristic Regression Models and a Web-Based, GIS Model User Interface

Presenter Information

Chris Wilkowske

Location

ECC 303/305

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu/htm/conference/past-spring-runoff-conferences

Start Date

5-4-2007 11:10 AM

End Date

5-4-2007 11:30 AM

Description

Reliable estimates of a wide range of streamflow characteristics are needed by structure designers, land-use planners, and resource managers. The magnitude and frequency of floods for streams in Utah are needed for the design of near-stream or in-stream structures, floodplain delineation, and flood hazard assessment. Current estimates of flood frequency distributions for ungaged streams in Utah are based on analyses done in 1992 of data through water year 1986 and do not incorporate more recent peak-flow data or newly developed estimating techniques. Previous studies and resulting regression model sets for Utah have been limited to flood magnitude and frequency estimation and have not included an evaluation of low-flow, monthly, or annual streamflow characteristics. Annual and monthly streamflow statistics can assist planners and managers with decisions related to fish and wildlife, water rights, and land use. Estimates of low-flow characteristics also are important to local resource-management activities such as evaluating the effects of wastewater drainage or runoff from communities, industries, and agriculture on water quality. The U.S. Geological Survey operates a network of streamflow-gaging stations in Utah that provides streamflow data for a variety of purposes. Because it is not feasible to operate streamflow-gaging stations at all locations where planning, structure design, or water-management decisions must be made, the association of the physical characteristics and statistical characteristics of data from gaged sites can be used to make estimates of flow at ungaged locations. These estimates can be obtained from statistically developed regional equations. A first step in developing the statistical models used for obtaining streamflow estimates is to determine statistically significant geohydrologic regions. Following the regionalization process, regression models for each region are developed from relations between drainage basin and climatic characteristics, and computed and estimated streamflow-gaging station statistics. Finally, these equations will be incorporated into a web-based statistical tool that will provide consistent and accurate natural streamflow estimates for unregulated drainage basins that are less than about 500 square miles in size in the state of Utah.

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Apr 5th, 11:10 AM Apr 5th, 11:30 AM

Estimating Streamflow Statistics for Ungaged Streams in Utah – Development of Regional Flow-Characteristic Regression Models and a Web-Based, GIS Model User Interface

ECC 303/305

Reliable estimates of a wide range of streamflow characteristics are needed by structure designers, land-use planners, and resource managers. The magnitude and frequency of floods for streams in Utah are needed for the design of near-stream or in-stream structures, floodplain delineation, and flood hazard assessment. Current estimates of flood frequency distributions for ungaged streams in Utah are based on analyses done in 1992 of data through water year 1986 and do not incorporate more recent peak-flow data or newly developed estimating techniques. Previous studies and resulting regression model sets for Utah have been limited to flood magnitude and frequency estimation and have not included an evaluation of low-flow, monthly, or annual streamflow characteristics. Annual and monthly streamflow statistics can assist planners and managers with decisions related to fish and wildlife, water rights, and land use. Estimates of low-flow characteristics also are important to local resource-management activities such as evaluating the effects of wastewater drainage or runoff from communities, industries, and agriculture on water quality. The U.S. Geological Survey operates a network of streamflow-gaging stations in Utah that provides streamflow data for a variety of purposes. Because it is not feasible to operate streamflow-gaging stations at all locations where planning, structure design, or water-management decisions must be made, the association of the physical characteristics and statistical characteristics of data from gaged sites can be used to make estimates of flow at ungaged locations. These estimates can be obtained from statistically developed regional equations. A first step in developing the statistical models used for obtaining streamflow estimates is to determine statistically significant geohydrologic regions. Following the regionalization process, regression models for each region are developed from relations between drainage basin and climatic characteristics, and computed and estimated streamflow-gaging station statistics. Finally, these equations will be incorporated into a web-based statistical tool that will provide consistent and accurate natural streamflow estimates for unregulated drainage basins that are less than about 500 square miles in size in the state of Utah.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2007/AllAbstracts/13