Event Title

BASINS Watershed Analysis System— Integrating with MapWindow Open Source GIS

Presenter Information

Daniel P. Ames

Location

ECC 303/305

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu/htm/conference/past-spring-runoff-conferences

Start Date

5-4-2007 1:30 PM

End Date

5-4-2007 1:50 PM

Description

EPA’s Better Assessment Science Integrating Point and Nonpoint Sources (BASINS) is a multipurpose environmental analysis system designed for use by regional, state, and local agencies performing watershed and water quality-based studies. This system makes it possible to quickly assess large amounts of data in a format that is easy to use and understand. BASINS integrates environmental data, analytical tools, and modeling programs to support development of cost-effective approaches to watershed management and environmental protection. All versions of BASINS to date have included a suite of GIS-based tools and have operated in a GIS environment, using the GIS interface as the front end of the user interface. The current release of BASINS, version 4.0, is the first to be primarily based on a non-proprietary, open-source GIS foundation. A careful analysis of BASINS’ needs revealed a relatively small number of critical core GIS functions, all of which could be provided through publicly available algorithms and source code. By using open-source GIS tools and non-proprietary data formats, the core of BASINS can now be independent of any proprietary GIS platform while still accommodating users of several different GIS software platforms. The underlying software architecture provides a clear separation between interface components, general GIS functions, and GIS platform-specific functions. Separating these components and functions provides a future migration path for using core GIS functions from other GIS packages or for accommodating future updates to the already-supported GIS packages. The open source GIS tool, MapWindow, was chosen for use in BASINS 4.0 for three primary reasons: 1) it is fully extensible using a plug-in extension interface; 2) it has an active and supportive international developer community; and 3) it supports both vector and raster data manipulation in most common file formats. We expect that this effort will encourage many new BASINS users who previously could not use this federally funded tool because of inability to purchase expensive proprietary GIS software. Additionally, it is anticipated that the use of open source software will provide BASINS with somewhat greater stability and transparency because the source code for all components—including the foundational GIS software—will always be available to end users and the federal government.

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Apr 5th, 1:30 PM Apr 5th, 1:50 PM

BASINS Watershed Analysis System— Integrating with MapWindow Open Source GIS

ECC 303/305

EPA’s Better Assessment Science Integrating Point and Nonpoint Sources (BASINS) is a multipurpose environmental analysis system designed for use by regional, state, and local agencies performing watershed and water quality-based studies. This system makes it possible to quickly assess large amounts of data in a format that is easy to use and understand. BASINS integrates environmental data, analytical tools, and modeling programs to support development of cost-effective approaches to watershed management and environmental protection. All versions of BASINS to date have included a suite of GIS-based tools and have operated in a GIS environment, using the GIS interface as the front end of the user interface. The current release of BASINS, version 4.0, is the first to be primarily based on a non-proprietary, open-source GIS foundation. A careful analysis of BASINS’ needs revealed a relatively small number of critical core GIS functions, all of which could be provided through publicly available algorithms and source code. By using open-source GIS tools and non-proprietary data formats, the core of BASINS can now be independent of any proprietary GIS platform while still accommodating users of several different GIS software platforms. The underlying software architecture provides a clear separation between interface components, general GIS functions, and GIS platform-specific functions. Separating these components and functions provides a future migration path for using core GIS functions from other GIS packages or for accommodating future updates to the already-supported GIS packages. The open source GIS tool, MapWindow, was chosen for use in BASINS 4.0 for three primary reasons: 1) it is fully extensible using a plug-in extension interface; 2) it has an active and supportive international developer community; and 3) it supports both vector and raster data manipulation in most common file formats. We expect that this effort will encourage many new BASINS users who previously could not use this federally funded tool because of inability to purchase expensive proprietary GIS software. Additionally, it is anticipated that the use of open source software will provide BASINS with somewhat greater stability and transparency because the source code for all components—including the foundational GIS software—will always be available to end users and the federal government.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2007/AllAbstracts/2