Event Title

Friends of the Teton River-Using Watershed Science to Protect and Restore the Water Resources of Teton Valley, Idaho/Wyoming

Presenter Information

Lyn Benjamin

Location

ECC 307/309

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu/htm/conference/past-spring-runoff-conferences

Start Date

5-4-2007 1:50 PM

End Date

5-4-2007 2:10 PM

Description

Friends of the Teton River (FTR) is a grassroots, membership based organization working to advance the health and welfare of the upper Teton watershed through credible research, education and citizen participation. In 2000, FTR was formed by a group of farmers, outfitters and guides, scientists, conservationists and government agency representatives to use sound science to protect and restore the water resources of the upper Teton watershed. From its extensive research, FTR has implemented watershedscale research and monitoring programs, completed thousands of linear feet of stream restoration projects, educated and activated citizens to get involved in local water issues and communicated with agency personnel to discuss policy change. FTR’s sound science, education focus, collaborative approach, advisory capacity and onthe-ground projects make the organization well suited to address important issues and advocate for collaborative solutions. Formed by a wide variety of stakeholders, FTR regularly partners with the U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Idaho Fish and Game, Idaho Department of Environmental Quality, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Idaho State University, Utah State University, Natural Resources Conservation Service, Teton Conservation District in Wyoming, the Cities of Driggs, Victor and Tetonia, Teton County, and numerous private landowners and foundations. FTR has conducted extensive research on the native Yellowstone cutthroat trout (YCT) in the upper Teton Watershed, including: 1) detailed hydrologic analyses of the valley (including two groundwater studies, and a surface/groundwater study to assess the effects of hydrologic alteration on native trout); 2) a study of the distribution and abundance of juvenile YCT, recruitment bottlenecks, and spawning distribution; 3) a 2005 study of barriers to fish passage and entrainment hazards in Teton River tributaries; and 4) a 2005 study of trout populations in the headwater tributary streams to the Teton River. Additionally, FTR designed and implemented a valley-wide water quality monitoring program. FTR entered into a contract with Idaho Department of Water Resources (IDWR) in the spring of 2005 to assume watermaster/hydrographer duties throughout Teton Valley, including the assessing the condition of irrigation diversions, conducting diversion flow measurements, and working with irrigation companies. This work has allowed us to understand a variety of local irrigation and water-right issues that are unique to Teton Valley. FTR has completed a comprehensive K-12 watershed curriculum and has integrated it into the local public schools. FTR actively works with K-12 classes in the watershed, and we also conduct frequent public forums on watershed resources.

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Apr 5th, 1:50 PM Apr 5th, 2:10 PM

Friends of the Teton River-Using Watershed Science to Protect and Restore the Water Resources of Teton Valley, Idaho/Wyoming

ECC 307/309

Friends of the Teton River (FTR) is a grassroots, membership based organization working to advance the health and welfare of the upper Teton watershed through credible research, education and citizen participation. In 2000, FTR was formed by a group of farmers, outfitters and guides, scientists, conservationists and government agency representatives to use sound science to protect and restore the water resources of the upper Teton watershed. From its extensive research, FTR has implemented watershedscale research and monitoring programs, completed thousands of linear feet of stream restoration projects, educated and activated citizens to get involved in local water issues and communicated with agency personnel to discuss policy change. FTR’s sound science, education focus, collaborative approach, advisory capacity and onthe-ground projects make the organization well suited to address important issues and advocate for collaborative solutions. Formed by a wide variety of stakeholders, FTR regularly partners with the U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Idaho Fish and Game, Idaho Department of Environmental Quality, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Idaho State University, Utah State University, Natural Resources Conservation Service, Teton Conservation District in Wyoming, the Cities of Driggs, Victor and Tetonia, Teton County, and numerous private landowners and foundations. FTR has conducted extensive research on the native Yellowstone cutthroat trout (YCT) in the upper Teton Watershed, including: 1) detailed hydrologic analyses of the valley (including two groundwater studies, and a surface/groundwater study to assess the effects of hydrologic alteration on native trout); 2) a study of the distribution and abundance of juvenile YCT, recruitment bottlenecks, and spawning distribution; 3) a 2005 study of barriers to fish passage and entrainment hazards in Teton River tributaries; and 4) a 2005 study of trout populations in the headwater tributary streams to the Teton River. Additionally, FTR designed and implemented a valley-wide water quality monitoring program. FTR entered into a contract with Idaho Department of Water Resources (IDWR) in the spring of 2005 to assume watermaster/hydrographer duties throughout Teton Valley, including the assessing the condition of irrigation diversions, conducting diversion flow measurements, and working with irrigation companies. This work has allowed us to understand a variety of local irrigation and water-right issues that are unique to Teton Valley. FTR has completed a comprehensive K-12 watershed curriculum and has integrated it into the local public schools. FTR actively works with K-12 classes in the watershed, and we also conduct frequent public forums on watershed resources.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2007/AllAbstracts/24