Event Title

Evaluation of Traditional and Alternative Water Quality Monitoring Techniques

Presenter Information

Nancy Mesner

Location

ECC 307/309

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu/htm/conference/past-spring-runoff-conferences

Start Date

5-4-2007 11:10 AM

End Date

5-4-2007 11:30 AM

Description

Traditional water quality monitoring approaches have generally relied on discreet grab samples analyzed for a standard set of water quality parameters. In many systems, however, monthly, bi-weekly, or even weekly grab samples may be inadequate to capture the natural or anthropogenic variability in pollutant concentrations. This can lead to an inaccurate estimates of annual pollutant loads and a greater focus on steady point source loading when intermittent or infrequent nonpoint source loads are important but not characterized by grab samples.

In addition, it is questionable whether traditional monitoring approaches are adequate for evaluating changes in water quality that result from the implementation of agricultural best management practices. As part of the national Conservation Effects Assessment Program, our team is working to compare traditional monitoring efforts with alternative methods. This presentation will focus on evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of both traditional and alternative monitoring approaches. We will discuss our efforts to establish high frequency, continuous water quality monitoring in the Little Bear River of Northern Utah, which we have paired with periodic and storm event sampling using automated ISCO samplers.

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Apr 5th, 11:10 AM Apr 5th, 11:30 AM

Evaluation of Traditional and Alternative Water Quality Monitoring Techniques

ECC 307/309

Traditional water quality monitoring approaches have generally relied on discreet grab samples analyzed for a standard set of water quality parameters. In many systems, however, monthly, bi-weekly, or even weekly grab samples may be inadequate to capture the natural or anthropogenic variability in pollutant concentrations. This can lead to an inaccurate estimates of annual pollutant loads and a greater focus on steady point source loading when intermittent or infrequent nonpoint source loads are important but not characterized by grab samples.

In addition, it is questionable whether traditional monitoring approaches are adequate for evaluating changes in water quality that result from the implementation of agricultural best management practices. As part of the national Conservation Effects Assessment Program, our team is working to compare traditional monitoring efforts with alternative methods. This presentation will focus on evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of both traditional and alternative monitoring approaches. We will discuss our efforts to establish high frequency, continuous water quality monitoring in the Little Bear River of Northern Utah, which we have paired with periodic and storm event sampling using automated ISCO samplers.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2007/AllAbstracts/9