Event Title

Mapping the growth potential of walleye and black crappie in Cutler Reservoir: a bioenergetics based habitat suitability model

Presenter Information

Kirk Dahle

Location

ECC 216

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu/htm/conference/past-spring-runoff-conferences

Start Date

5-4-2007 5:45 PM

End Date

5-4-2007 5:50 PM

Description

Spatial delineation of temperature and food availability is necessary in order to accurately predict the non linear growth and consumption responses of game fish in large, heterogeneous reservoirs. Cutler Reservoir, northern UT, demonstrates a wide range of physical conditions and potential water quality problems including high summertime water temperature, low dissolved oxygen, and high nutrient loading. In order to quantify the effect of these water quality parameters on fish growth potential, we measured a suite of biotic and abiotic variables across six sites during 2005-2006. We then combined measurements of water temperature, fish distribution, diet, and growth into a bioenergetic-based model. Bioenergetic model information was then processed using a GIS framework to spatially delineate the growth potential of the predominant fish species throughout the reservoir. The predicted growth potential of these fish varied according to spatial variability in temperature and food availability, acting in combination with species–specific physiological tolerances and habitat preferences. The majority of the reservoir demonstrates optimal growth potential for carp, catfish, and crappie; however, walleye experience a temperature and dissolved oxygen habitat "squeeze" that occurs on a longitudinal profile, rather than the more commonly observed vertical profile. Given that walleye are particularly sensitive to warm water temperatures and low concentrations of dissolved oxygen, their distribution and abundance may provide managers with a valuable index of water quality. Ultimately this model will provide a tool for identifying the factors potentially limiting fish populations in Cutler Reservoir as well as illustrating the role of water quality in structuring the fish community of the system.

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Apr 5th, 5:45 PM Apr 5th, 5:50 PM

Mapping the growth potential of walleye and black crappie in Cutler Reservoir: a bioenergetics based habitat suitability model

ECC 216

Spatial delineation of temperature and food availability is necessary in order to accurately predict the non linear growth and consumption responses of game fish in large, heterogeneous reservoirs. Cutler Reservoir, northern UT, demonstrates a wide range of physical conditions and potential water quality problems including high summertime water temperature, low dissolved oxygen, and high nutrient loading. In order to quantify the effect of these water quality parameters on fish growth potential, we measured a suite of biotic and abiotic variables across six sites during 2005-2006. We then combined measurements of water temperature, fish distribution, diet, and growth into a bioenergetic-based model. Bioenergetic model information was then processed using a GIS framework to spatially delineate the growth potential of the predominant fish species throughout the reservoir. The predicted growth potential of these fish varied according to spatial variability in temperature and food availability, acting in combination with species–specific physiological tolerances and habitat preferences. The majority of the reservoir demonstrates optimal growth potential for carp, catfish, and crappie; however, walleye experience a temperature and dissolved oxygen habitat "squeeze" that occurs on a longitudinal profile, rather than the more commonly observed vertical profile. Given that walleye are particularly sensitive to warm water temperatures and low concentrations of dissolved oxygen, their distribution and abundance may provide managers with a valuable index of water quality. Ultimately this model will provide a tool for identifying the factors potentially limiting fish populations in Cutler Reservoir as well as illustrating the role of water quality in structuring the fish community of the system.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2007/AllPosters/16