Event Title

What are effective treatments for controlling small, dense patches of Phragmites australis in Great Salt Lake wetlands?

Presenter Information

Christine Rohal

Location

ECC 201/203 & 205/207

Event Website

https://water.usu.edu/htm/conference/2013conference

Start Date

9-4-2013 4:55 PM

End Date

9-4-2013 5:05 PM

Description

Phragmites australis has been expanding rapidly in the wetlands of the Great Salt Lake (GSL). The dense and vigorous growth of this invasive plant make it inhospitable habitat for the waterfowl and shorebirds that rely on the hemispherically important GSL wetlands. Here we present our plan for a multi-year study, started in the summer of 2012, which will examine the effectiveness of six treatments for controlling dense, quarter-acre patches of Phragmites at six sites along the eastern shore of the GSL. A balanced incomplete block design will be employed across the six sites such that all treatments will be equally replicated. The treatments are 1.) a summer mow, followed by a fall glyphosate spray, 2.) a summer glyphosate spray, followed by a winter mow, 3.) a fall glyphosate spray, followed by a winter mow, 4.) a summer imazapyr spray, followed by a winter mow, 5.) a summer mow immediately covered by heavy-duty black plastic, 6.) an untreated control. Percent cover of Phragmites, density of Phragmites, species richness, and vegetation structure will be measured to understand the response of Phragmites and native vegetation to treatments. Changes in the seed bank will also be measured using a greenhouse, seedling emergence method. Environmental conditions including soil moisture, soil nutrients, and soil salinity will be monitored for their potential impact on treatment effectiveness. The findings from this multi-year study will be used to develop Best Management Practices for controlling Phragmites in GSL wetlands.

 
Apr 9th, 4:55 PM Apr 9th, 5:05 PM

What are effective treatments for controlling small, dense patches of Phragmites australis in Great Salt Lake wetlands?

ECC 201/203 & 205/207

Phragmites australis has been expanding rapidly in the wetlands of the Great Salt Lake (GSL). The dense and vigorous growth of this invasive plant make it inhospitable habitat for the waterfowl and shorebirds that rely on the hemispherically important GSL wetlands. Here we present our plan for a multi-year study, started in the summer of 2012, which will examine the effectiveness of six treatments for controlling dense, quarter-acre patches of Phragmites at six sites along the eastern shore of the GSL. A balanced incomplete block design will be employed across the six sites such that all treatments will be equally replicated. The treatments are 1.) a summer mow, followed by a fall glyphosate spray, 2.) a summer glyphosate spray, followed by a winter mow, 3.) a fall glyphosate spray, followed by a winter mow, 4.) a summer imazapyr spray, followed by a winter mow, 5.) a summer mow immediately covered by heavy-duty black plastic, 6.) an untreated control. Percent cover of Phragmites, density of Phragmites, species richness, and vegetation structure will be measured to understand the response of Phragmites and native vegetation to treatments. Changes in the seed bank will also be measured using a greenhouse, seedling emergence method. Environmental conditions including soil moisture, soil nutrients, and soil salinity will be monitored for their potential impact on treatment effectiveness. The findings from this multi-year study will be used to develop Best Management Practices for controlling Phragmites in GSL wetlands.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2013/AllPosters/14