Event Title

Capturing the effects of spatially variable stream hydraulics in solute transport modeling

Location

Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu

Start Date

2-4-2014 5:30 PM

End Date

2-4-2014 5:45 PM

Description

Spatial estimates of stream hydraulic and geomorphic channel properties are fundamental in reach scale, solute transport modeling. Currently, there is limited understanding of how best to establish reach segment lengths that capture the effects of spatially variable channel properties. We address this challenge through the use of channel property distributions derived from high-resolution, remotely sensed imagery collected over a study reach. We determine the minimum number of reach segments necessary to represent spatially variable influences on downstream solute predictions and reproduce the observed channel property distributions. We also test if moment statistics provide comparable results and, therefore, a more efficient measure for establishing appropriate segment lengths. We find that changes in both solute predictions and moment statistics began to diminish at a certain number of reach segments, indicating that the effects of spatial variability were captured. Based on these findings, it appears that reach segments need to represent only a majority of the observed channel property distributions. Application of these approaches in other modeling efforts provides the foundation necessary to focus on identifying key model parameters.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 2nd, 5:30 PM Apr 2nd, 5:45 PM

Capturing the effects of spatially variable stream hydraulics in solute transport modeling

Eccles Conference Center

Spatial estimates of stream hydraulic and geomorphic channel properties are fundamental in reach scale, solute transport modeling. Currently, there is limited understanding of how best to establish reach segment lengths that capture the effects of spatially variable channel properties. We address this challenge through the use of channel property distributions derived from high-resolution, remotely sensed imagery collected over a study reach. We determine the minimum number of reach segments necessary to represent spatially variable influences on downstream solute predictions and reproduce the observed channel property distributions. We also test if moment statistics provide comparable results and, therefore, a more efficient measure for establishing appropriate segment lengths. We find that changes in both solute predictions and moment statistics began to diminish at a certain number of reach segments, indicating that the effects of spatial variability were captured. Based on these findings, it appears that reach segments need to represent only a majority of the observed channel property distributions. Application of these approaches in other modeling efforts provides the foundation necessary to focus on identifying key model parameters.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2014/2014Abstracts/33