Event Title

Sediment grain size and mobility analysis of Pleasant Creek, Capitol Reef National Park

Location

Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu

Start Date

2-4-2014 4:45 PM

End Date

2-4-2014 5:00 PM

Description

Capitol Reef National Park lies in south-central Utah on the Waterpocket Fold and holds within it an array of geomorphologic features. Small communities near the park are historically based on small ranching, farming, and some mining operations. Little research has been done in this area, particularly with respect to the river morphology and sediment distribution and transport on the perennial rivers flowing in the National Park. In this study, we quantified the spatial variation of grain sizes and determined hydrologic variables to evaluate the potential for sediment mobility along this reach of the creek. In the field, we took sediment samples and mapped the channel using an RTK Trimble GPS system. In the sediment lab, sieved samples and graphed the cumulative grain size distribution. In the computer lab, we calculated shear stress and critical discharge and then determined the percent exceedance to evaluate how often that discharge occurs. We are particularly interested in the geomorphic impact of the monsoon season on the creek. This work forms the base data for repeat collections as part of a UVU Gemorphology course each spring for comparison and analysis overtime. The creek’s proximity to Utah Valley University’s Capitol Reef Field Station means that it will be accessible and the results will be relevant to both the national park and classes at the field station.

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Apr 2nd, 4:45 PM Apr 2nd, 5:00 PM

Sediment grain size and mobility analysis of Pleasant Creek, Capitol Reef National Park

Eccles Conference Center

Capitol Reef National Park lies in south-central Utah on the Waterpocket Fold and holds within it an array of geomorphologic features. Small communities near the park are historically based on small ranching, farming, and some mining operations. Little research has been done in this area, particularly with respect to the river morphology and sediment distribution and transport on the perennial rivers flowing in the National Park. In this study, we quantified the spatial variation of grain sizes and determined hydrologic variables to evaluate the potential for sediment mobility along this reach of the creek. In the field, we took sediment samples and mapped the channel using an RTK Trimble GPS system. In the sediment lab, sieved samples and graphed the cumulative grain size distribution. In the computer lab, we calculated shear stress and critical discharge and then determined the percent exceedance to evaluate how often that discharge occurs. We are particularly interested in the geomorphic impact of the monsoon season on the creek. This work forms the base data for repeat collections as part of a UVU Gemorphology course each spring for comparison and analysis overtime. The creek’s proximity to Utah Valley University’s Capitol Reef Field Station means that it will be accessible and the results will be relevant to both the national park and classes at the field station.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2014/2014Abstracts/36