Event Title

The effect of Aeolian dust on the trace element and nutrient chemistry of snowpack and snowmelt runoff in high alpine watersheds in Nevada and Utah

Presenter Information

Dylan Dastrup
Gregory Carling

Location

Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu

Start Date

2-4-2014 1:45 PM

End Date

2-4-2014 2:00 PM

Description

Aeolian dust contributes to trace metal and nutrient concentrations in ecosystems. In the future, climate change is expected to increase dust storm frequency and intensity in S.W. US. Over the past 150 years CO and UT have seen a 5-7 fold increase in dust deposition and a 400% increase in trace metals. Elevated concentrations of trace metals, nitrogen and phosphorus from dust may contribute to mercury advisories for fish consumption and harmful algal blooms in remote alpine lakes. Snowpack, and snowmelt from 2012/2013 were analyzed for trace metals and strontium isotopes to evaluate their relationships and origins. Concentrations of anilities from the snowpack ranged from 5.5X?10?^(-7) ppm – 0.28 ppm suggesting the snow was not affected by dust. Strontium ratios suggest different sources of chemical components between snow and snowmelt. A plan for further work and research will be discussed.

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Apr 2nd, 1:45 PM Apr 2nd, 2:00 PM

The effect of Aeolian dust on the trace element and nutrient chemistry of snowpack and snowmelt runoff in high alpine watersheds in Nevada and Utah

Eccles Conference Center

Aeolian dust contributes to trace metal and nutrient concentrations in ecosystems. In the future, climate change is expected to increase dust storm frequency and intensity in S.W. US. Over the past 150 years CO and UT have seen a 5-7 fold increase in dust deposition and a 400% increase in trace metals. Elevated concentrations of trace metals, nitrogen and phosphorus from dust may contribute to mercury advisories for fish consumption and harmful algal blooms in remote alpine lakes. Snowpack, and snowmelt from 2012/2013 were analyzed for trace metals and strontium isotopes to evaluate their relationships and origins. Concentrations of anilities from the snowpack ranged from 5.5X?10?^(-7) ppm – 0.28 ppm suggesting the snow was not affected by dust. Strontium ratios suggest different sources of chemical components between snow and snowmelt. A plan for further work and research will be discussed.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2014/2014Abstracts/51