Event Title

Characterization of atmospheric particles in the United States

Presenter Information

Rong Li

Location

Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu

Start Date

1-4-2014 6:35 PM

End Date

1-4-2014 6:40 PM

Description

Atmospheric PM10 (particulate matter with a diameter less than 10 um) consists of both fine particles (PM2.5; particulate matter with a diameter less than 2.5 um) and coarse particles (PM10-2.5; particulate matter with a diameter between 2.5 and 10 um). Both PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 have adverse effects on human health, and can considerably affect climate as well as hydrological and biogeochemical cycles. However, over the past decades both model and measurement studies on PM primarily focused on PM2.5 with little attention being given to PM10-2.5. We analyzed observations of both PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 concentrations in the United States and used the information to assess the importance of various sources. Data analyses revealed that PM10-2.5 seems to be a more important component than PM2.5 for the control of PM10 in the United States. Poor correlations were generally found between PM10-2.5 and PM2.5, suggesting that PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 are generally influenced by different sources. Accurate PM10-2.5 modeling tools are needed by both scientific community and regulatory agencies for mitigation strategies and health effect assessments. We also conducted the first evaluation of CMAQ (the Community Multiscale Air Quality modelling system) performance for atmospheric coarse particles, one of the most advanced air quality models. This study has identified some important gaps for future model development.

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Apr 1st, 6:35 PM Apr 1st, 6:40 PM

Characterization of atmospheric particles in the United States

Eccles Conference Center

Atmospheric PM10 (particulate matter with a diameter less than 10 um) consists of both fine particles (PM2.5; particulate matter with a diameter less than 2.5 um) and coarse particles (PM10-2.5; particulate matter with a diameter between 2.5 and 10 um). Both PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 have adverse effects on human health, and can considerably affect climate as well as hydrological and biogeochemical cycles. However, over the past decades both model and measurement studies on PM primarily focused on PM2.5 with little attention being given to PM10-2.5. We analyzed observations of both PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 concentrations in the United States and used the information to assess the importance of various sources. Data analyses revealed that PM10-2.5 seems to be a more important component than PM2.5 for the control of PM10 in the United States. Poor correlations were generally found between PM10-2.5 and PM2.5, suggesting that PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 are generally influenced by different sources. Accurate PM10-2.5 modeling tools are needed by both scientific community and regulatory agencies for mitigation strategies and health effect assessments. We also conducted the first evaluation of CMAQ (the Community Multiscale Air Quality modelling system) performance for atmospheric coarse particles, one of the most advanced air quality models. This study has identified some important gaps for future model development.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2014/2014Posters/7