Event Title

A modeling system for studying climate-ecosystem interactions

Presenter Information

Rong Li

Location

Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu

Start Date

1-4-2014 6:30 PM

End Date

1-4-2014 6:35 PM

Description

Climate change significantly affects ecosystem development and growth as well as distribution of vegetation; in return, terrestrial ecosystems also affect the climate through biophysical and biogeochemical pathways. Through the biophysical pathway, terrestrial ecosystems affect the climate by regulating exchanges of water and energy between the atmosphere and land, influencing precipitation, temperature, turbulent mixing, and atmospheric circulations. The terrestrial ecosystems also regulate biogeochemical cycles that affect atmospheric concentrations of green-house gases, leading to climate change. Quantifying climate-ecosystem interactions is vital in addressing a range of complex issues such as climate change and sustainability of ecosystem services (e.g. forest and agriculture). We coupled state-of-the-art terrestrial ecosystem and land surface models to create a useful tool for studying climate-ecosystem interactions and the carbon cycle. The coupled system is a process-based model that simulates the dynamics and disturbances of ecosystems with various plants including trees, crops, and grasses at local, regional, and global scales. In this presentation, I will introduce the coupled modeling system and its applications.

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Apr 1st, 6:30 PM Apr 1st, 6:35 PM

A modeling system for studying climate-ecosystem interactions

Eccles Conference Center

Climate change significantly affects ecosystem development and growth as well as distribution of vegetation; in return, terrestrial ecosystems also affect the climate through biophysical and biogeochemical pathways. Through the biophysical pathway, terrestrial ecosystems affect the climate by regulating exchanges of water and energy between the atmosphere and land, influencing precipitation, temperature, turbulent mixing, and atmospheric circulations. The terrestrial ecosystems also regulate biogeochemical cycles that affect atmospheric concentrations of green-house gases, leading to climate change. Quantifying climate-ecosystem interactions is vital in addressing a range of complex issues such as climate change and sustainability of ecosystem services (e.g. forest and agriculture). We coupled state-of-the-art terrestrial ecosystem and land surface models to create a useful tool for studying climate-ecosystem interactions and the carbon cycle. The coupled system is a process-based model that simulates the dynamics and disturbances of ecosystems with various plants including trees, crops, and grasses at local, regional, and global scales. In this presentation, I will introduce the coupled modeling system and its applications.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2014/2014Posters/8